Collections

Pages

Mayan Languages Collection of Jaime Pérez González
Do not cite, curation in progress., No citar, en proceso de curacion.
Mayan Languages Collection of Terrence Kaufman
This collection contains materials collected by Terrence Kaufman during his research on Mayan languages. These materials were gathered from 1959 to 2004, with most materials dating from 1960 to 1993. These materials include texts and data gathered by Kaufman himself (especially for Huasteco, Tzeltal, Mochó and Tzotzil), secondary works incorporating published and unpublished data gathered by others (e.g. papers working out the classification of the family), and primary data collected by others and given to Kaufman. Most Mayan languages are represented in this collection, however, many are only represented by a relatively small number of forms (taken from published or unpublished sources) in comparative works, or are materials that were not collected by Kaufman himself, but were found among his papers. Below is a list of the numbers of folders in this collection in or about the named languages. Many folders contain comparative works and are labeled with more than one language, hence the totals here exceed the number of folders in the collection.This collection contains 593 folders of 410 audio recordings and 950 documents
  • Huasteco [hus] 226 folders, 202 audio recordings, 288 documents
  • Tzeltal [tzh] 160 folders, 36 audio recordings, 396 documents
  • Mochó [mhc] 79 folders, 83 audio recordings, 168 documents
  • Mayan (family-wide or comparative topics) 39 folders, 0 audio recordings, 118 documents
  • Tzotzil [tzo] 30 folders, 35 audio recordings, 69 documents
  • Lacandon [lac] 17 folders, 16 audio recordings, 58 documents
  • Kaqchikel [cak] 15 folders, 0 audio recordings, 89 documents
  • K'ichee' [quc] 15 folders, 0 audio recordings, 76 documents
  • Q'eqchi' [kek] 13 folders, 0 audio recordings, 69 documents
  • Tektiteko [ttc] 12 folders, 14 audio recordings, 94 documents
  • Poqomchi' [poh] 11 folders 0 audio recordings, 64 documents
  • Ixil [ixl] 10 folders 17 audio recordings, 60 documents
  • Poqomam [poc] 9 folders 0 audio recordings, 62 documents
  • Mam [mam] 7 folders 3 audio recordings, 74 documents
  • Ch'ol [ctu] 7 folders 0 audio recordings, 60 documents
  • Awakateko [agu] 6 folders 0 audio recordings, 58 documents
  • Tz'utujil [tzj] 6 folders 0 audio recordings, 64 documents
  • Uspanteko [usp] 5 folders 4 audio recordings, 57 documents
  • Chorti [caa] 4 folders 0 audio recordings, 57 documents
  • Yukateko [chf] 4 folders 0 audio recordings, 57 documents
  • Chuj [cac] 4 folders 0 audio recordings, 57 documents
  • Achi [acr] 4 folders 0 audio recordings, 70 documents
  • Tojolab'al [toj] 3 folders 0 audio recordings, 56 documents
  • Mopán [mop] 3 folders 0 audio recordings, 56 documents
  • Popti' [jac] 2 folders 0 audio recordings, 55 documents
  • Q'anjob'al [kjb] 1 folder 0 audio recordings, 54 documents
  • Yokot'an [chf] 1 folder 0 audio recordings, 54 documents
  • Chicomuceltec [cob] 1 folder 0 audio recordings, 55 documents
  • Sakapulteko [quv] 1 folder 0 audio recordings, 1 document
  • Itza' [itz] 1 folder 1 audio recording, 0 documents
  • Ch'olti' 1 folder 0 audio recordings, 1 document
Project history
  • 1960 Fieldwork in Chiapas with Duane Metzger on Tzeltal (Aguacatenango and Tenejapa), Tzotzil (Chamula). Some work on Ch'ol.
  • 1961 Field work in Chiapas. Tzeltal, Tzotzil
  • 1961 Administered Chicago Project's Tzeltal-Tzotzil dialect survey questionnaire in several Tzeltal towns
  • 1962 Field work in San Cristobal de las Casas, Chiapas on Zinancatán Tzotzil syntax
  • 1963 Ph.D. dissertation, University of California, Berkeley Tzeltal Grammar (based on Aguacatenango Tzeltal)
  • 1962-1968 Kaufman prepares a Mayan Vocabulary Survey and sends copies to various Mayanists asking them to complete and return the surveys
  • 1967 Recorded and transcribed texts in San Cristobal de las Casas, Chiapas with two speakers of Motozintla Mochó.
  • 1965 Excursion to Lacandon jungle with Trudy Blom
  • 1967 Preliminary Mochó Vocabulary. 321 pp. Working Paper No. 5, Language-Behavior Research Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, October.
  • 1967-1968 Fieldwork in Motozintla and Tuzantán on Mochó and Tuzanteco with Ray Freeze.
  • 1967-1968 Fieldwork on Tacaneco Western Mam (Tiló) and the previously unrecognized Tektiteko (Teco) with Ray Freeze.
  • 1968 Fieldwork on Mochó and Tuzanteco.
  • 1969 Teco: A new Mayan language. International Journal of American Linguistics 35(2): 154-174.
  • 1968-1970 Research on Ixil with speaker Xhas Sijom (Jacinto de Paz Pérez) in Irvine, California with hosts Nick and Lore Colby.
  • 1968 Brief work with Northern Mam while hosted by John Robertson in Provo, Utah
  • 1969 Fieldwork in Tamazunchale on two dialects of Huasteco.
  • 1970-1979 Work with Francisco Marroquín Linguistic Project
  • 1980-1990 summer fieldwork on Huasteco based in Tamazunchale
  • 1980 Fieldwork on Huasteco (Potosino, Tantoyuca) with Will Norman. Meets Benigno Robles Reyes
  • 1981 Fieldwork on Tantoyuca Huasteco in Tamazunchale
  • 1982 Fieldwork on Potosino and Tantoyuca Huasteco in Tamazunchale
  • 1983 Wrote and administered Huasteco dialect survey in 16 towns based out of Tamazunchale, accompanied by Kathy Budway
  • 1984 Fieldwork on Tancanhuitz, Tantoyuca and Chinampa Huasteco accompanied by Kathy Budway and Bruce Franklin based in Tamazunchale
  • 1986 Fieldwork in Tamazunchale on Huasteco lexicography accompanied by Kathy Budway
The bulk of the materials were given to AILLA by Terrence Kaufman for digitization and preservation in 2012. Some born-digital materials were given to AILLA beginning at that time. After processing, physical media was returned to Kaufman beginning in May 2018. Interactive Google maps showing locations of languages present in this and other Terrence Kaufman collections in AILLA are available Most items in this collection are Public Access, whereas a few are Restricted. Refer to AILLA's Access Levels and Conditions of Use for more information. Materials related to Kaufman's work on Mayan languages as part of other organized projects can be found in their respective collections Project for the Documentation of the Languages of MesoAmerica Collection Francisco Marroquín Linguistic Project Yokot'an (Tabasco Chontal) Dialect Survey The digitization and preservation of this collection was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. BCS-1157867. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation., Esta colección contiene materiales recopilados por Terrence Kaufman durante sus investigaciones sobre los idiomas mayas. Los materials son de 1959 a 2004, y la mayoría datan de 1960 a 1993. Incluyen textos y datos recopilados por Kaufman mismo (especialemente los materiales del huasteco, tseltal, mochó y tsotsil), trabajos secundarios que incorporan los datos publicados e inéditos ajenos (p.ej. los trabajos que tratan de la clasificación de la familia) y datos primarios que fueron recopilados por otros y dados a Kaufman. Muchos de los idiomas mayas en esta colección son representados solo por una relativamente pequeña cantidad de datos (muchos tomados de otras fuentes) en trabajos comparativos, o son materiales que no fueron recopilados por Kaufman sino se encontraron entre sus papeles. Abajo hay una lista de los números de carpetas, grabaciones de audio, y documentos que hay para cada idioma en la presente colección. Como muchas carpetas y archivos están etiquetados con varios idiomas, las sumas superan la cantidad de los objetos en la colección. Son 593 carpetas con 410 grabaciones de audio y 950 documentos.
  • Huasteco [hus] 226 carpetas, 202 audios, 288 documentos
  • Tseltal [tzh] 160 carpetas, 36 audios, 396 documentos
  • Mochó [mhc] 79 carpetas, 83 audios, 168 documentos
  • Maya (de toda la familia) 39 carpetas, 0 audios, 118 documentos
  • Tsotsil [tzo] 30 carpetas, 35 audios, 69 documentos
  • Lacandon [lac] 17 carpetas, 16 audios, 58 documentos
  • Kaqchikel [cak] 15 carpetas, 0 audios, 89 documentos
  • K'ichee' [quc] 15 carpetas, 0 audios, 76 documentos
  • Q'eqchi' [kek] 13 carpetas, 0 audios, 69 documentos
  • Tektiteko [ttc] 12 carpetas, 14 audios, 94 documentos
  • Poqomchi' [poh] 11 carpetas 0 audios, 64 documentos
  • Ixil [ixl] 10 carpetas 17 audios, 60 documentos
  • Poqomam [poc] 9 carpetas 0 audios, 62 documentos
  • Mam [mam] 7 carpetas 3 audios, 74 documentos
  • Ch'ol [ctu] 7 carpetas 0 audios, 60 documentos
  • Awakateko [agu] 6 carpetas 0 audios, 58 documentos
  • Tz'utujil [tzj] 6 carpetas 0 audios, 64 documentos
  • Uspanteko [usp] 5 carpetas 4 audios, 57 documentos
  • Chorti [caa] 4 carpetas 0 audios, 57 documentos
  • Yukateko [chf] 4 carpetas 0 audios, 57 documentos
  • Chuj [cac] 4 carpetas 0 audios, 57 documentos
  • Achi [acr] 4 carpetas 0 audios, 70 documentos
  • Tojolab'al [toj] 3 carpetas 0 audios, 56 documentos
  • Mopán [mop] 3 carpetas 0 audios, 56 documentos
  • Popti' [jac] 2 carpetas 0 audios, 55 documentos
  • Q'anjob'al [kjb] 1 carpeta 0 audios, 54 documentos
  • Yokot'an [chf] 1 carpeta 0 audios, 54 documentos
  • Chicomucelteco [cob] 1 carpeta 0 audios, 55 documentos
  • Sakapulteko [quv] 1 carpeta 0 audios, 1 documentos
  • Itza' [itz] 1 carpeta 1 audios, 0 documentos
  • Ch'olti' 1 carpeta 0 audios, 1 documentos
Historia del proyecto
  • 1960 Trabajo de campo en Chiapas con Duane Metzger sobre tseltal (de Aguacatenango y Tenejapa), tsotzil (de Chamula). Algún trabajo sobre ch'ol.
  • 1961 Trabajo de campo en Chiapas. Tseltal, tsotsil
  • 1961 Administró el el cuestionario lingüístico de tseltal-tsotsil del Proyecto de Chicago en unos pueblos tseltales
  • 1962 Trabajo de campo en San Cristobal de las Casas, Chiapas sobre el sintaxis del tsotsil de Zinancatán
  • 1963 Disertación doctoral, Universidad de California, Berkeley Tzeltal Grammar (gramática del tseltal de Aguacatenango)
  • 1962-1968 Kaufman prepara un cuestionario de vocabulario maya y envía copias a unos mayanistas pidiéndo que las rellenaran y devolvieran
  • 1967 Grabó y transcribió textos en San Cristobal de las Casas, Chiapas con dos hablantes del mochó de Motozintla.
  • 1965 Excursión a la selva lacandona con Trudy Blom
  • 1967 Preliminary Mochó Vocabulary. 321 pp. Working Paper No. 5, Language-Behavior Research Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, October.
  • 1967-1968 Trabajo de campo en Motozintla y Tuzantán sobre mochó y tuzanteco con Ray Freeze.
  • 1967-1968 Trabajo de campo sobre el mam occidental tacaneco (tiló) y el aun no reconocido tektiteko (teco) con Ray Freeze.
  • 1968 Trabajo de campo sobre mochó y tuzanteco.
  • 1969 Teco: A new Mayan language. International Journal of American Linguistics 35(2): 154-174.
  • 1968-1970 Investigación sobre ixil con el hablante Xhas Sijom (Jacinto de Paz Pérez) en Irvine, California con los anfitriones Nick y Lore Colby.
  • 1968 Trabajo breve con el mam norteño en Provo, Utah con el anfitrión John Robertson
  • 1969 Trabajo de campo en Tamazunchale sobre dos dialects del huasteco.
  • 1970-1979 Trabajo con el Proyecto Lingüístico Francisco Marroquín
  • 1980-1990 trabajo de campo en el verano con sede en Tamazunchale sobre el huasteco
  • 1980 Trabajo de campo sobre huasteco (de Potosí y Tantoyuca) con Will Norman. Conoce a Benigno Robles Reyes
  • 1981 Trabajo de campo en Tamazunchale sobre el huasteco de Tantoyuca
  • 1982 Trabajo de campo en Tamazunchale sobre el huasteco potosino y de Tantoyuca
  • 1983 Preparó y administró un cuestionario lingüístico huasteco en 16 pueblos desde Tamazunchale, acompañado por Kathy Budway
  • 1984 Trabajo de campo en Tamazunchale sobre el huasteco de Tancanhuitz, Tantoyuca y Chinampa acompañado por Kathy Budway y Bruce Franklin
  • 1986 Trabajo de campo en Tamazunchale sobre el léxico huasteco acompañado por Kathy Budway
Terrence Kaufman entregó estos materiales a AILLA para su digitalización y preservación en 2012. A partir de entonces se empezó a entregar unos archivos nacidos digitales también. Después del procesamiento, los materiales físicos se devolvieron a Kaufman a partir de mayo del 2018 Mapas interactivas de Google mostrando las localidades e idiomas presentes en ésta y otras colecciones de Terrence Kaufman en AILLA son disponibles La mayoría de los archivos en esta colección son de Acesso Público y otros son Restringidos. Refiérese a losNiveles de Acceso y las Condiciones de Uso para más información. Otros materiales relacionados con el trabajo de Kaufman sobre idiomas maya como parte de otros proyectos organizados se pueden encontrar en las siguientes colecciones Proyecto para la Documentación de las Lenguas de MesoAmerica Proyecto Lingüístico Francisco Marroquín Encuesta Lingüística de Yokot'an (Chontal de Tabasco) La digitalización y preservación de esta colección fue apoyado por la Beca No. BCS-1157867 de la National Science Foundation. Cualquier opinión, hallazgos, conclusión o recomendación expresado en estos materiales son de los autores y no reflejan necesariamente los de la National Science Foundation.
Mayan Languages Collection of Victoria Bricker
The first Tzotzil recording was made in 1964 and the last in 1972. From 1964 through 1969, my research focused on humor in Zinacantan, with the assistance of an NIMH Predoctoral Fellowship (MH-20,345), the Harvard Chiapas Project, directed by Evon Z. Vogt, and a grant from the Harvard Graduate Society. The collection includes (1) elicited humorous narratives, songs, and prayers; (2) "live" recordings of ritual humor at the fiestas of Saint Lawrence, Christmas, New Year's Day, Epiphany, and Saint Sebastian; and (3) didactic materials (lessons, texts, and exercises). In 1971, I initiated a comparative study of oral and written accounts of Maya revitalization movements, which necessitated expansion of the geographical coverage to Chamula and Chenalho in highland Chiapas and to the Yucatan peninsula in the lowlands. This research was supported by the Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research (Grant No. 2807) and the Tulane University Council on Research in 1971 and the Foreign Area Fellowship Program of the Social Science Research Council in 1972. The Yucatecan recordings include (1) histories of the Caste War of Yucatan of 1847-1901 and local manifestations of the Mexican Revolution of 1917-1921; (2) legends; (3) astronomical lore; (4) medical lore; (5) autobiographies; (6) conversations; (7) and songs (both traditional and original) from a number of different towns in the peninsula. The collection also includes one Chol narrative from Tila, Chiapas, and four descriptions of fiestas in Huazalinguillo Nahuatl. Resource YUA003R001 contains a one-page file listing the names of all the speakers who participated in the creation of this collection. This file is included for historical completeness, but it will be restricted for many years to come. Funds for archiving this collection at AILLA were provided by the National Endowment for the Humanities. Additional materials related to this collection are archived at the American Philosophical Society: https://search.amphilsoc.org/collections/view?docId=ead/Mss.Ms.Coll.178-ead.xml., La primera grabación tzotzil fue hecho en 1964 y la última en 1972. Desde 1964 hasta 1969, mis investigaciones fueron enfocadas en el humor en Zinacantán, con apoyo de una beca NIMH Predoctoral (MH-20,345), el Proyecto Chiapas de Harvard, dirigido por Evon Z. Vogt, y una beca de la Harvard Graduate Society. La colección incluye (1) narrativas humoristas, canciones, y rezas elicitadas; (2) grabaciones "vivas" de humor ritual en las fiestas de San Laurenzo, Navidad, Día de Año Nuevo, Epifanía, y San Sebastiano; y (3) materiales didácticos (lecciones, textos, y ejercicios.) En 1971, inicié un estudio comparativo de explicaciones orales y escritas de movimientos Maya de revitalización, que necesitó ampliación del tratamiento geográfico a Chamula y Chenalho en la tierra alta de Chiapas y a la península Yucatán en la tierra baja. Esta investigación fue apoyado por la Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research (Grant No. 2807) y el Tulane University Council on Research in 1971 y el Foreign Area Fellowship Program del Social Science Research Council en 1972. Las grabaciones yucatecas incluyen (1) historias de la Guerra de Castas de Yucatán de 1847-1901 y manifestaciones locales de la Revolución Mexicana de 1917-1921; (2) leyendas; (3) saber astronómico; (4) saber médico; (5) autobiográficos; (6) conversaciones; (7) y canciones (ambas tradicionales y originales) de varios pueblos en la península. La colección además incluye una narrativa chol de Tila, Chiapas, y cuatro descripciones de fiestas en Huazalinguillo Nahuatl. Recurso YUA003R001 contiene un archivo de una página listando los nombres de toda la gente quienes participaron en la creación de esta colección. Este archivo se incluye para completar los datos históricos, pero sería restringido para muchos años. Fondos para archivar esta colección fueron proporcinado por la National Endowment for the Humanities. Materiales adicionales relacionados con esta colección se encuentran en la American Philosophical Society: https://search.amphilsoc.org/collections/view?docId=ead/Mss.Ms.Coll.178-ead.xml.
Mbyá Guaraní Collection of Robert Dooley
This collection consists of interlinear texts with glosses and free translations in Portuguese and English and grammatical labels in English. Later, I expect to add a Guaraní-Portuguese lexicon & introductory grammar sketch (in Portuguese). Collection published in June 2011., Esta colección consiste de textos interlinear con glosas y traducciones libres in portugués y inglés y etiquetas gramaticales en inglés. Más tarde, espero añadir un léxico Guaraní-Portugués y una esboza prelimnar del gramática (en portugués.) Colección publicado en junio de 2011.
MesoAmerican Language Collection of George Aaron Broadwell
http://www.albany.edu/anthro/fac/broadwell.htm, These materials are primarily based on work with a native speaker of San Dionisio Ocotepec Zapotec who now lives near Albany, NY and reflect data gathered between 1998 and the present. In the earlier material, the name of the language is spelled San Dionicio, which reflects a common (but incorrect) spelling of the name of the town. San Dionisio Ocotepec is located in the Tlacolula district of Oaxaca, Mexico. The town has approximately 5,000 people, nearly all of whom speak Zapotec. The variety of Zapotec spoken here shows many similarities to the varieties spoken in San Pablo Güilá, San Lucas Quiaviní, Tlacolula de Matamoros, and Santa Ana del Valle. Research supported by the University at Albany, State University of New York., Estos materiales son basados principalmente en trabajo con una hablante natural de zapoteco de San Dionisio Ocotepec quien ya vive cerca de Albany, NY y reflejan datos ajuntados entre 1998 y el presente. En los materiales antes, el nombre de la lengua se escribe San Dionicio, que refleja una ortografía común (pero incorrecto) del nombre del pueblo. San Dionisio Ocotepec se ubica en el distrito Tlacolula de Oaxaca, M xico. El pueblo tiene aproximadamente 5,000 gente, casi todos hablantes del zapoteco. La variedad de zapoteco que se habla aqu muestra muchas similaridades a las variedades habladas en San Güilá, San Lucas Quiaviní, Tlacolula de Matamoros, y Santa Ana del Valle. Investigaciones apoyado por la Universidad en Albany, State University of New York.
MesoAmerican Languages Collection of Kathryn Josserand
This collection includes audio recordings, transcriptions, translations and field notes, created in the 1970's and 1980's. For the Mixtecan survey: There are several overview docs. They all contain different views on the data, as aides to relate recordings to places. The file 'josserand_overview3.pdf' contains a table relating: town, state, district, Josserand code, ISO code (where possible), AILLA ID and ID of original tape. For the Otomí and Mazahua surveys: COPY OF CIS-INAH Proyecto 33, May, 1974. Notes from the tape boxes with information about towns and speakers are transcribed in OTM001R001I101.pdf and MAZ001R001I101.pdf. Funds for archiving this collection were provided by the National Endowment for the Humanities. The handwritten transcriptions accompanying the Mixtec-language audio recordings in this collection are being transcribed and annotated with the From the Page software as part of a NEH Humanities Collections and Reference Resources pilot grant. Visit the website to view and transcribe some of the documents., Esta colección incluye grabaciones de audio, transcripciones, traducciones y notas del campo, creado en los 1970s y 1980's Para la encuesta mixteca: Hay varios documentos con sobrevistas. Todos contienen vistas diferentes en los datos, como ayudas para relacionar grabaciones a lugares. El archivo 'josserand_overview3.pdf' contiene una mesa relacionando: pueblo, estado, distrito, código Josserand, código ISO (donde posible), AILLA ID y ID de la cinta original. Para las encuestas de Otomí y Mazahua : COPY OF CIS-INAH Proyecto 33, mayo 1974. Notas de las cajas de las cintas con informaciones sobre pueblos y hablantes son transcrito en OTM001R001I101.pdf y MAZ001R001I101.pdf. Fondos para archivar esta colección fueron proporcinado por la National Endowment for the Humanities. Las transcripciones hechas a mano que acompañan a las grabaciones en idioma mixteco de esta colección están parte de un proyecto de transcripción y anotación con el software From the Page como parte de una beca piloto de NEH Humanities Collections and Reference Resources. Visite el sitio para ver y transcribir unos de los documentos.
The Mexicano of Tlaxcala Collection of Lucero Flores
Materials in and about the Mexicano of Tlaxcala, Mexico.The collection comes from two towns, one of Tlaxcala and the other of Puebla. Both belongs to the same language. The documentation began in July 2014 and it will finish in 2018. The objective of this documentation is to collect texts that Lucero Flores will use to describe and analyze the morphosyntactic and semantic features of this language. This data will be used for Lucero Flores's doctoral dissertation research., Este proyecto se trata de la documentación lingüística del náhuatl de San Isidro Buensuceso, Tlaxcala y San Miguel Canoa, Puebla durante el periodo de agosto de 2014 a 2018. El objetivo de esta documentación es recolectar textos que sirvan para la descripción y análisis morfosintáctico y semántico de esta variante del náhuatl. Los datos serán utilizados para la tesis doctoral de Lucero Flores., Itech inin tekitl kah nochi tlen onikgrabaroh ompa San Isidro Buensuceso, Tlaxcala wan San Miguel Canoa, Puebla. Onikchih itech in julio 2014-2018. Ika nin tlaolololistli, niwelilti nikmachtis nochi in tlahtoltsitsin, ken yawe, ken se tlahtoa wan tlen kinekih kihtoskeh. Ika nochi inin nikchiwas in notesis itech in doctorado.
Mopan Maya Collection of Yuki Tanaka-McFarlane
This collections contains recordings in Belizean Mopan, a Mayan language of Belize, that were recorded by Yuki Tanaka-McFarlane in the course of her doctoral studies. Many of the materials gathered here are referenced and discussed in her 2018 Ph.D. thesis Documenting Belizean Mopan: An exploration on the role of language documentation and renewal from language ideological, affective, ethnographic, and discourse perspectives, which can also be found in the collection. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. BCS-1264199. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation., La presente colección contiene las grabaciones en el mopán beliceño, un idioma mayance de Belice, que Yuki Tanaka-McFarlane hizo a lo largo de sus investigaciones doctorales. La mayoría de los materiales aquí están citadas y descritas en su tesis doctoral de 2018 Documenting Belizean Mopan: An exploration on the role of language documentation and renewal from language ideological, affective, ethnographic, and discourse perspectives. Una copia de la misma se encuentra en la colección. Este material se basa en trabajo apoyado por la National Science Foundation bajo subvención número BCS-1264199. Cualquier opinión, hallazgo, conclusión o recomendación expresado son de la autora y no necesariamente reflejan los de la National Science Foundation.
Nadëb Collection
This collection contains Nadëb language materials. Nadëb belongs to the Naduhup language family and has about 500 speakers. Most of these materials were recorded in Roçado community, Uneiuxi River, Amazonas, Brazil., Esta colección contiene materiales lingüísticos de Nadëb. Nadëb pertenece a la familia lingüística Naduhup y tiene unos 500 hablantes. La mayoría de estos materiales se registraron en la comunidad de Roçado, Río Uneiuxi, Amazonas, Brasil.
Nahuatl Documentary "Silvestre Pantaleón"
http://www.icarusfilms.com/new2012/silv.html, SILVESTRE PANTALEÓN is the story of an elderly man from the Nahuatl-speaking village of San Agustín Oapan, Mexico. It begins as a local curandero reads the protagonist's fortune in the cards and diagnoses the costly remedy to his ills: a complex series of offerings to the hearth, the ants, the river, and the deceased. Silvestre Pantaleón then struggles to pull together the money needed to pay for the curing ceremony and provide for his family, dedicating himself to the only remunerative activities he knows: handcrafting rope (made from the fibers of an agave plant) for religious ceremonies and making seldom-used household objects that he alone still has the skills to produce. SILVESTRE PANTALEÓN--the result of a collaboration between an anthropologist who lives Oapan and a filmmaker dedicated to working in indigenous communities--unfolds with no interviews or narration. Rather, scenes from daily life are woven together in rich ethnographic detail and lingering imagery that explore a rural community situated in the shadow of a highway bridge to the international resort of Acapulco. Over this bridge pass thousands of tourists, oblivious to the village life just below yet worlds apart. In Nahuatl with choice of English, Spanish, or French subtitles, along with a transcription of the Nahuatl dialogue. DVD includes two PDF files with Nahuatl-English and Nahuatl-Spanish texts. "Superb visually, this film is extremely valuable as a social and cultural document. It demonstrates the complex relationship between traditional and contemporary life in Latin American indigenous communities. The collaboration between the filmmaker and the linguistic anthropologist is a model for the rest of indigenous Latin America. The film is sensitive and thought provoking. It will appeal to both scholars and the general public and can be used effectively in classroom teaching." —Joel Sherzer, Professor Emeritus, Department of Anthropology, University of Texas at Austin, Founder of the Archive of Indigenous Languages of Latin America "The cinematography is exquisite. The film is a profound and meditative ethnography on the life, livelihood, and artisanship of a patriarch and his family. It is recommended for anthropology, art, gerontology, and Latin American and Native American Studies courses."—Educational Media Reviews Online "SILVESTRE PANTALEON is an extraordinary portrait of an ordinary man."—Anthropology Review Database "SILVESTRE PANTALEON is a superb example of the intersection of endangered language research in a cultural context and documentary filmmaking. This film will be particularly useful in the university classroom in courses on language documentation, ethnography, cultural anthropology, or any class examining language-in-use as the portal to all aspects of Indigenous knowledge of craft, ceremony, ecology and economy. Furthermore, it serves as a model product of long-term language documentation research in a speaker community setting." —Dr. Andrea L. Berez, Department of Linguistics, University of Hawai'i at Manoa, and Technology Section Editor, Language Documentation and Conservation Best Feature-Length Documentary, 2011 Morelia Film Festival Pemio 360° (Principal Prize), 2011 International Documentary Film Festival of Mexico City Gran Prix Tehuikan (Best film, all Categories), 2011 Montreal First Peoples' Festival 2011 National Geographic All Roads Film Festival 2012 Green Screens: Cinema Planeta, Film Society at Lincoln Center
Niels Fock & Eva Krener Collection from a Cañari Village, Juncal, Cañar, Ecuador
The photographs in this collection are the result of research on adaptation to the physical and political environment of the indigenous Cañarí of Juncal, Ecuador, as well as their concept of the world. Anthropologists Niels Fock and Eva Krener did this research from September 1973 to August 1974, and from August 1977 to January 1978. Their work was made possible with the financial support of the Government Council of Humanist Studies and the University of Copenhagen. A representative sample of the material culture of the indigenous Cañarís, such as traditional costumes and utility items, has been deposited with the Ethnographic Collection of the National Museum of Denmark. In 1954 Niels Fock conducted an anthropological study on the indigenous Waiwai in British Guiana and in 1958 and 1961 on the indigenous Mataco in Argentina. See also the Waiwai Collection of Niels Fock. A guide to this collection (in English) is available: Fock-Krener_Cañar-FindingAid-eng.pdf., Las fotografías de esta colección es producto de una investigación sobre la adaptación al medio ambiente y al ambiente político, además del concepto propio del mundo de los indígenas cañarí de Ecuador. El estudio fue hecho por antropólogos Niels Fock y Eva Krener, en la temporada de septiembre de 1973 hasta agosto de 1974, y desde agosto 1977 hasta enero 1978. La investigación fue posible con el apoyo económico del Consejo Gubernamental de Estudios Humanistas y la Universidad de Copenhague. Una muestra representativa de la cultura material de los indígenas cañarís, por ejemplo trajes tradicionales y artículos de utilidad, se han transferido a la Colección Etnográfica del Museo Nacional de Dinamarca. En 1954 Niels Fock ha realizado un estudio antropologico sobre los indigenas Waiwai in British Guiana y en 1958 y 1961 sobre los indigenas Mataco en Argentina. Véase también la Colección Waiwai de Niels Fock. Una guía (en español) para esta colección está disponible: Fock-Krener_Cañar-FindingAid-spa.pdf.
Nivaĉle Collection of Alejandra Vidal
The Nivaĉle data in this archive have been collected between 2014 and 2019. Data collection has partially been supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation (Grant BCS 1263817) and by the Argentinian CONICET. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation. The collection includes texts of multiple genres, elicited sentences, and lexical data. Research assistance for this collection was provided by Manuel Otero, Haley Hash, Thomas Krause, Will Jones, Kyler Porzelius and Tillena Trebon., Los datos sobre la lengua Nivaĉle han sido recolectados en Argentina y Paraguay, con el apoyo de la Fundación norteamericana NSF (Grant BCS 1263817) y el CONICET de la República Argentina. Cualquier opinión, hallazgos, conclusión o recomendación expresado son de los autores y no necesariamente reflejan los de la National Science Foundation. Contiene textos, audios y videos, así como oraciones y léxico obtenidos a través de la elicitación directa. Ayuda investigatoria fue proporcionado por Manuel Otero, Haley Hash, Thomas Krause, Will Jones, Kyler Porzelius y Tillena Trebon.
The Northern Pame Collection of Clifton Pye, Scott Berthiaume and Barbara Pfeiler
http://pyersqr.org/, The collection contains 131 recordings and transcriptions of 10 Northern Pame children between the ages of 1;7 and 4;2 living in two Northern Pame villages near La Palma in the state of San Luis Potosí, Mexico. The recordings took place between midmorning and midafternoon in and around the children’s homes. During the recording sessions the children interacted with other members of their extended families as well as with a Pame-speaking investigator. The collection was made possible through funding by the National Science Foundation grant BCS-1360874, 2013-1019. Any opinion, finding or recommendation belong to the authors and are not necessarily those of the National Science Foundation., Esta colección contiene 131 grabaciones y transcripciones de 10 niños hablantes del pame del norte que tenían entre 1;7 y 4;2 años que vivían en dos pueblos del pame del norte cerca de La Palma en el estado de San Luis Potosí, México. Las grabaciones tuvo lugar por las mañanas y las tardes en las casas de los niños. Durante las sesiones, los niños interactuaban con otros miembros de sus familias y un investigador que habla pame. La colección fue posible por una subvención de la National Science Foundation grant BCS-1360874, 2013-1019. Cualquier opinión, hallazgo o recomendación es de los autores y no necesariamente los de la National Science Foundation.
Olfactory Lexicon Research on Huehuetla Tepehua
http://meaningculturecognition.ruhosting.nl/out-of-the-lab/field-sites/huehuetla-tepehua/, This research was supported by The Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research NWO VICI grant “Human olfaction at the intersection of language, culture and biology," project number 277-70-011, Asifa Majid, PI. Kung and O'Meara collected the data in Huehuetla, Hidalgo, Mexico, over a 4-day period (August 6-9, 2014)., Esta investigación fue apoyada por la Organización Neerlandesa para la Investigación Científica NWO VICI subvención "olfato humano en la intersección de la lengua, la cultura y la biología," proyecto número 277-70-011, Asifa Majid, PI. Kung y O'Meara recopilaron los datos en Huehuetla, Hidalgo, México, durante un período de 4 días (del 6 al 9 de agosto de 2014).
The Paresi Collection of Ana Paula Brandão
Materials about the Haliti-Paresi language of Mato Grosso, Brazil. Primarily concerning the majority variant of the Haliti-Paresi language which was the focus of Ana Paula Brandão's doctoral dissertation research. This material is based upon work supported by The Goeldi Museum in Brazil, The University of Texas at Austin and the Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina., Materiales sobre el idioma Haliti-Paresi de Mato Grosso, Brasil. Principalmente en relación con la variante mayoritaria de la lengua Haliti-Paresi que fue el foco de la investigación doctoral de Ana Paula Brandão. Este material se basa en el trabajo apoyado por el Museo Goeldi en Brasil, The University of Texas at Austin e Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina.
Pilagá Collection of Alejandra Vidal
lenguapilaga.com.ar, The Pilagá data in this archive have been collected starting in the late 1990's and continuing to 2019. Research since 2014 has partially been supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation (Grant BCS 1263817) and by the Argentinian CONICET. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation. The collection includes texts of multiple genres, elicited sentences, and lexical data. Research assistance for this collection was provided by Haley Hash, Thomas Krause, Will Jones, Kyler Porzelius and Tillena Trebon., Los datos de Pilagá en este archivo se han recopilado a partir de finales de los años 90 y hasta 2019. Las investigaciones desde 2014 han sido parcialmente respaldadas por la Fundación Nacional de Ciencias de los Estados Unidos (Grant BCS 1263817) y por el CONICET argentino. Cualquier opinión, hallazgos, conclusión o recomendación expresado son de los autores y no necesariamente reflejan los de la National Science Foundation. La colección incluye textos de múltiples géneros, oraciones obtenidas y datos léxicos. Ayuda investigatoria fue proporcionado por Haley Hash, Thomas Krause, Will Jones, Kyler Porzelius y Tillena Trebon.
Proceedings of the Conference on Indigenous Languages of Latin America - VIII
This collection contains the proceedings of the eighth Conference on the Indigenous Languages of Latin America (CILLA) held at the University of Texas at Austin on October 25-27, 2017. CILLA VIII Proceedings
  • Aguilar, Andrés: The realization of laryngeal features in Ja’a Kumiai
  • Michal Brody: Expansión semántica y pragmática del prefijo x- en el maaya yucateco actual
  • Gabriela Caballero and Qi Cheng: Marcación de persona en el kumiai de Ja'a
  • Gabriela Caballero (with Austin German): Tono y estructura morfológica en el rarámuri (tarahumara) de Choguita
  • Eric W. Campbell: La estructura diversa de las construcciones relativas en el chatino de Zenzontepec
  • Román de la Cruz Morales: La semántica de la predicación secundaria por medio de una construcción sintética en zoque de Ocotepec, Chiapas
  • Celeste Escobar: Alofonía y tipos de raíces en el pãĩ tavyterã guaraní (tupí-guaraní) de Ita Guasu, Amambay, Paraguay
  • Lucero Flores Nájera: La (no)configuracionalidad de las frases en el náhuatl de Tlaxcala
  • Paulette Levy and Néstor Hernández-Green: La duración en el totonaco de Coatepec: su manifestación en distintos niveles de la jerarquía prosódica.
  • Simon L. Peters: Inventario y distribución tonal en el mixteco de San Martín Peras
  • Clifton Pye and Scott Berthiaume: Developing Lexical Production in Xi’iuy (Northern Pame)
  • J. Ryan Sullivant: La colaboración digital abierta para la transcripción de textos manuscritos de idiomas ingígenas
, La presente colección contiene las memorias del octavo Congreso de los Idiomas Indígenas de Latinoamérica (CILLA) que tuvo lugar en la Universidad de Tejas en Austin el 25-27 de octubre de 2017. CILLA VIII Memorias
  • Aguilar, Andrés: The realization of laryngeal features in Ja’a Kumiai
  • Michal Brody: Expansión semántica y pragmática del prefijo x- en el maaya yucateco actual
  • Gabriela Caballero y Qi Cheng: Marcación de persona en el kumiai de Ja'a
  • Gabriela Caballero (en colaborción con Austin German): Tono y estructura morfológica en el rarámuri (tarahumara) de Choguita
  • Eric W. Campbell: La estructura diversa de las construcciones relativas en el chatino de Zenzontepec
  • Román de la Cruz Morales: La semántica de la predicación secundaria por medio de una construcción sintética en zoque de Ocotepec, Chiapas
  • Celeste Escobar: Alofonía y tipos de raíces en el pãĩ tavyterã guaraní (tupí-guaraní) de Ita Guasu, Amambay, Paraguay
  • Lucero Flores Nájera: La (no)configuracionalidad de las frases en el náhuatl de Tlaxcala
  • Paulette Levy y Néstor Hernández-Green: La duración en el totonaco de Coatepec: su manifestación en distintos niveles de la jerarquía prosódica.
  • Simon L. Peters: Inventario y distribución tonal en el mixteco de San Martín Peras
  • Clifton Pye y Scott Berthiaume: Developing Lexical Production in Xi’iuy (Northern Pame)
  • J. Ryan Sullivant: La colaboración digital abierta para la transcripción de textos manuscritos de idiomas ingígenas
Project for the Documentation of the Languages of MesoAmerica
This collection contains materials related to the Project for the Documentation of the Languages of MesoAmerica (PDLMA) which was a large-scale effort to document many of the languages of southern Mexico. From 1993 until 2010, the PDLMA (which went by different names in its earliest and latest iterations) functioned by bringing together speakers of indigenous Mesoamerican languages with academic linguists for summer field sessions in various locations, including Fortín de las Flores, Veracruz; Catemaco, Veracruz; Oaxaca City, Oaxaca; and San Cristóbal de las Casas, Chiapas. Researchers' activities were guided and supervised by Kaufman and other PDLMA personnel, and occasionally, materials were recorded in the speakers' home communities. The researcher(s) and the year(s) that each language was studied are given below:
  • Chatino, Yaitepec --- Jeffrey Rasch 1996-1998, 2010
  • Chatino, Zenzontepec --- Troi Carleton 1996-1997; Eric Campbell 2007-2010
  • Yokot'an --- Brad Montgomery-Anderson 2003-2005, 2010
  • Lakandon --- Henrik Bergqvist 2003, 2005
  • Matlatzinka --- Terrence Kaufman 1997; Nancy Koch 1997-1999; Thomas Larsen 1997
  • Mije, Isthmus --- Giulia Oliviero 1996-1998
  • Mije, Oluteco --- Roberto Zavala 1994-1996
  • Mije, Sayula --- Dennis Holt 1994; Richard Rhodes 1994, 1996-1997, 2003; Terrence Kaufman 2006, 2008
  • Mije, Totontepec --- Dan Suslak 1996-1998, 2002-2003
  • Nawa, Pajapan --- Valentín Peralta 2002-2005, 2009
  • Nawa, Sierra de Zongolica --- Sergio Romero 1999-2000, 2002; Steffen Haurholm-Larsen 2009
  • Nawa, Tacuapan --- Una Canger 2002, 2004, 2009-2010
  • Popoloka, San Felipe Otlaltepec --- Michael Swanton 1999-2000, 2002
  • Tepewa, Huehuetla --- Susan Smythe Kung 1999-2000, 2005
  • Tlawika --- Terrence Kaufman 1998; Nancy Koch 2005
  • Sapoteko, Atepec --- Yuka Kurihara 1995; Craig Hilts 1999-2000, 2003
  • Sapoteko, Chichicapan --- Thom Smith-Stark 1995-1997, 1999-2001, 2003
  • Sapoteko, Choapan --- Michael Galant 1995; Paula Rogers 1999; Paula Shenk 2002; Zuzana Tomkova 2006; Erin Donnelly 2009
  • Sapoteko, Coatec --- Rosemary Beam de Azcona 1995-1998
  • Sapoteko, Isthmus --- Terrence Kaufman 1995-1996; Marilyn Feke 1999; Gabriela Pérez Báez 2003-2004, 2007, 2009-2010
  • Sapoteko, Lachixío --- Felicia Lee 1995; David Monje 1996; Mark Sicoli 1997-1999, 2007
  • Sapoteko, Zaniza --- Indira Bakshi 1996; Natalie Operstein 1999-2000, 2003, 2008
  • Sapoteko, Zoogocho --- Carey Benom 2000
  • Soke, Ayapaneco --- Giulia Oliviero 2002; Suslak 2004-2005, 2007, 2009
  • Soke, Copainalá --- Mary Swift 1995; Cliff Pye 1996-1998
  • Soke, San Miguel Chimalapa --- Heidi Johnson 1994-1995; Terrence Kaufman 1994-1995, 1999-2005, 2007-2009
  • Soke, Santa María Chimalapa --- Terrence Kaufman 1994-1995, 1999-2005, 2007-2009; Lorena O'Connor 1995
  • Soke, Soteapan --- Valerie Himes 1994-1996; Terrence Kaufman 1999-2005, 2008
  • Soke, Tecpatán --- Roberto Zavala 2000, 2002-2005, 2007-2010
  • Soke, Texistepec --- Cathy Bereznak 1994-1996; Ehren Reilly 2001-2004
The bulk of the materials were given to AILLA by Terrence Kaufman for digitization and preservation in 2012. Some born-digital materials were given to AILLA beginning at that time. After processing, physical media was returned to Kaufman beginning in May 2018. The contents of this collection include the following numbers of folders and media files for each of the languages listed below. Note that folders and files can be labeled with more than one language. Mayan languages:
  • Yokot'an (Tabasco Chontal) --- 41 folders, 348 audio recordings, 4 video recordings, 136 PDF documents
  • Lakandon --- 40 folders, 91 audio recordings, 2 video recordings, 141 PDF documents, 5 transcriber files
  • Wasteko --- 10 folders, 58 audio recordings, 16 PDF documents
  • Mayan (family) --- 6 folders, 44 PDF documents
Mije-Sokean languages:
  • Mije, Isthmus --- 173 folders, 223 audio recordings, 38 PDF documents, 8 text files, 1 image
  • Soke, Santa María Chimalapa --- 115 folders, 17 audio recordings, 4 video recordings, 147 PDF documents, 26 text files
  • Soke, Soteapan --- 95 folders, 115 audio recordings, 2 video recordings, 175 PDF documents
  • Soke, Ayapaneco --- 77 folders, 92 audio recordings, 169 PDF documents, 25 text files
  • Soke, Texistepec --- 65 folders, 2545 audio recordings, 3 video recordings, 133 PDF documents, 8 text files
  • Mije, Sayula --- 64 folders, 15 audio recordings, 2 video recordings, 73 PDF documents
  • Mije, Totontepec --- 36 folders, 83 audio recordings, 52 PDF documents
  • Soke, San Miguel Chimalapa --- 29 folders, 74 audio recordings, 3 video recordings, 101 PDF documents
  • Mije, Oluta --- 26 folders, 25 audio recordings, 99 PDF documents
  • Soke, Copainalá --- 22 folders, 134 audio recordings, 74 PDF documents
  • Soke, Tecpatán --- 19 folders, 34 audio recordings, 2 video recordings, 91 PDF documents
  • Mixe-Zoque (family) --- 8 folders, 49 PDF documents
Otomanguean languages:
  • Chatino, Zenzontepec --- 168 folders, 227 audio recordings, 2 video recordings, 185 PDF documents
  • Sapoteko, Lachixío --- 134 folders, 567 audio recordings, 7 video recordings, 74 PDF documents
  • Sapoteko, Choapan --- 108 folders, 153 audio recordings, 1 video recording, 126 PDF documents
  • Sapoteko, Isthmus --- 97 folders, 352 audio recordings, 1 video recording, 259 PDF documents
  • Sapoteko, Atepec --- 73 folders, 98 audio recordings, 94 PDF documents
  • Sapoteko, Chichicapan --- 50 folders, 341 audio recordings, 130 PDF documents
  • Sapoteko, Coatec --- 46 folders, 47 audio recordings, 32 PDF documents
  • Chatino, Eastern, Santiago Yaitepec --- 43 folders, 22 audio recordings, 137 PDF documents
  • Tlawika --- 39 folders, 243 audio recordings, 52 PDF documents
  • Sapoteko, Zaniza --- 35 folders, 73 audio recordings, 2 video recordings, 103 PDF documents
  • Sapoteko, San Baltázar Loxicha --- 25 folders, 23 audio recordings, 5 PDF documents
  • Matlatzinka --- 24 folders, 146 audio recordings, 5 video recordings, 345 PDF documents, 1 image
  • Sapotekan (branch)--- 22 folders, 7 audio recordings, 1 video recordings, 45 PDF documents
  • Popoloka, San Felipe Otlaltepec --- 17 folders, 224 audio recordings, 70 PDF documents
  • Sapoteko, Miahuatlán/Cuixtla --- 11 folders, 24 audio recordings, 24 PDF documents
  • Sapoteko, Zoogocho --- 9 folders, 40 audio recordings, 1 video recording, 37 PDF documents
  • Iskateko --- 6 folders, 13 audio recordings
  • Sapoteko, Amatlán --- 2 folders, 4 PDF documents, 1 image
  • Popolokan (branch) --- 2 folders, 47 PDF documents
  • Otomanguean (family) --- 1 folders, 4 PDF documents
Totonakan languages:
  • Tepewa, Huehuetla --- 13 folders, 57 audio recordings, 2 video recordings, 93 PDF documents
  • Totonako, Highland --- 11 folders, 44 audio recordings, 1 video recording, 6 PDF documents
  • Totonakan (family) --- 6 folders, 63 PDF documents
Yuto-Nawan languages:
  • Nawa, Sierra de Zongolica --- 189 folders, 225 audio recordings, 75 PDF documents
  • Nawa, Istmo-Pajapan --- 34 folders, 141 audio recordings, 231 PDF documents
  • Nawa, Highland Puebla --- 28 folders, 54 audio recordings, 12 video recordings, 142 PDF documents
  • Nawa, Istmo-Mecayapan --- 7 folders, 18 audio recordings, 11 PDF documents
  • Nawa, Tabasco --- 1 folder, 4 PDF documents
Interactive Google maps showing locations of languages present in this and other Terrence Kaufman collections in AILLA are available Many items in this collection are Public Access, whereas others are Restricted. Refer to AILLA's Access Levels and Conditions of Use for more information. The digitization and preservation of this collection was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. BCS-1157867. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation., Esta colección contiene los materiales relacionados con el Proyecto para la Documentación de las Lenguas de MesoAmérica (PDLMA), el cual fue un esfuerzo a gran escala para registrar muchos de los idiomas del centro y sur de México. De 1993 a 2010, el PDLMA (concodio por otros nombres durante las primeras y últimas etapas) juntaba hablantes de idiomas indígenas mesoamericanos con lingüístas académicos por investigaciones de verano en varios lugares, incluso Fortín de las Flores, Veracruz; Catemaco, Veracruz; Oaxaca, Oaxaca; y San Cristóbal de las Casas, Chiapas. Las actividades de los investigadores fueron guiados y supervisados por Kaufman y otro personal de PDLMA, y en algunos casos, se grabaron materiales en las comunidades natales de los hablantes. Los investigadores y años de estudio de cada idioma aparecen también:
  • Chatino de Yaitepec --- Jeffrey Rasch 1996-1998, 2010
  • Chatino de Zenzontepec --- Troi Carleton 1996-1997; Eric Campbell 2007-2010
  • Yokot'an --- Brad Montgomery-Anderson 2003-2005, 2010
  • Lakandon --- Henrik Bergqvist 2003, 2005
  • Matlatzinka --- Terrence Kaufman 1997; Nancy Koch 1997-1999; Thomas Larsen 1997
  • Mije del Istmo --- Giulia Oliviero 1996-1998
  • Mije de Oluta --- Roberto Zavala 1994-1996
  • Mije de Sayula --- Dennis Holt 1994; Richard Rhodes 1994, 1996-1997, 2003; Terrence Kaufman 2006, 2008
  • Mije de Totontepec --- Dan Suslak 1996-1998, 2002-2003
  • Nawa de Pajapan --- Valentín Peralta 2002-2005, 2009
  • Nawa de Sierra de Zongolica --- Sergio Romero 1999-2000, 2002; Steffen Haurholm-Larsen 2009
  • Nawa de Tacuapan --- Una Canger 2002, 2004, 2009-2010
  • Popoloka de San Felipe Otlaltepec --- Michael Swanton 1999-2000, 2002
  • Tepewa de Huehuetla --- Susan Smythe Kung 1999-2000, 2005
  • Tlawika --- Terrence Kaufman 1998; Nancy Koch 2005
  • Sapoteko de Atepec --- Yuka Kurihara 1995; Craig Hilts 1999-2000, 2003
  • Sapoteko de Chichicapan --- Thom Smith-Stark 1995-1997, 1999-2001, 2003
  • Sapoteko de Choapan --- Michael Galant 1995; Erin Rogers 1999; Paula Shenk 2002; Zuzana Tomkova 2006; Erin Donnelly 2009
  • Sapoteko coateco --- Rosemary Beam de Azcona 1995-1998
  • Sapoteko del istmo --- Terrence Kaufman 1995-1996; Marilyn Feke 1999; Gabriela Pérez Báez 2003-2004, 2007, 2009-2010
  • Sapoteko de Lachixío --- Felicia Lee 1995; David Monje 1996; Mark Sicoli 1997-1999, 2007
  • Sapoteko de Zaniza --- Indira Bakshi 1996; Natalie Operstein 1999-2000, 2003, 2008
  • Sapoteko de Zoogocho --- Carey Benom 2000
  • Soke de Ayapa --- Giulia Oliviero 2002; Suslak 2004-2005, 2007, 2009
  • Soke de Copainalá --- Mary Swift 1995; Cliff Pye 1996-1998
  • Soke de San Miguel Chimalapa --- Heidi Johnson 1994-1995; Terrence Kaufman 1994-1995, 1999-2005, 2007-2009
  • Soke de Santa María Chimalapa --- Terrence Kaufman 1994-1995, 1999-2005, 2007-2009; Lorena O'Connor 1995
  • Soke de Soteapan --- Valerie Himes 1994-1996; Terrence Kaufman 1999-2005, 2008
  • Soke de Tecpatán --- Roberto Zavala 2000, 2002-2005, 2007-2010
  • Soke de Texistepec --- Cathy Bereznak 1994-1996; Ehren Reilly 2001-2004
Terrence Kaufman entregó estos materiales a AILLA para su digitalización y preservación en 2012. A partir de entonces se empezó a entregar unos archivos nacidos digitales también. Después del procesamiento, los materiales físicos se devolvieron a Kaufman a partir de mayo del 2018. Idiomas mayas:
  • Yokot'an (chontal de Tabasco) --- 41 carpetas, 348 audios, 4 videos, 136 documentos PDF
  • Lakandon --- 40 carpetas, 91 audios, 2 videos, 141 documentos PDF, 5 archivos de transcriber
  • Wasteko --- 10 carpetas, 58 audios, 16 documentos PDF
  • Maya (familia) --- 6 carpetas, 44 documentos PDF
Idiomas mije-sokes:
  • Mije del Istmo --- 173 carpetas, 223 audios, 38 documentos PDF, 8 text files, 1 imagen
  • Soke de Santa María Chimalapa --- 115 carpetas, 17 audios, 4 videos, 147 documentos PDF, 26 text files
  • Soke de Soteapan --- 95 carpetas, 115 audios, 2 videos, 175 documentos PDF
  • Soke de Ayapa --- 77 carpetas, 92 audios, 169 documentos PDF, 25 text files
  • Mije de Texistepec --- 65 carpetas, 2545 audios, 3 videos, 133 documentos PDF, 8 text files
  • Mije de Sayula --- 64 carpetas, 15 audios, 2 videos, 73 documentos PDF
  • Mije de Totontepec --- 36 carpetas, 83 audios, 52 documentos PDF
  • Soke de San Miguel Chimalapa --- 29 carpetas, 74 audios, 3 videos, 101 documentos PDF
  • Mije de Oluta --- 26 carpetas, 25 audios, 99 documentos PDF
  • Soke de Copainalá --- 22 carpetas, 134 audios, 74 documentos PDF
  • Soke de Tecpatán --- 19 carpetas, 34 audios, 2 videos, 91 documentos PDF
  • Mije-soke (familia) --- 8 carpetas, 49 documentos PDF
Idiomas otomangues:
  • Chatino de Zenzontepec --- 168 carpetas, 227 audios, 2 videos, 185 documentos PDF
  • Sapoteko de Lachixío --- 134 carpetas, 567 audios, 7 videos, 74 documentos PDF
  • Sapoteko de Choapan --- 108 carpetas, 153 audios, 1 video, 126 documentos PDF
  • Sapoteko del Istmo --- 97 carpetas, 352 audios, 1 video, 259 documentos PDF
  • Sapoteko de Atepec --- 73 carpetas, 98 audios, 94 documentos PDF
  • Sapoteko de Chichicapan --- 50 carpetas, 341 audios, 130 documentos PDF
  • Sapoteko coateco --- 46 carpetas, 47 audios, 32 documentos PDF
  • Chatino de Yaitepec --- 43 carpetas, 22 audios, 137 documentos PDF
  • Tlawika --- 39 carpetas, 243 audios, 52 documentos PDF
  • Sapoteko de Zaniza --- 35 carpetas, 73 audios, 2 videos, 103 documentos PDF
  • Sapoteko de San Baltázar Loxicha --- 25 carpetas, 23 audios, 5 documentos PDF
  • Matlatzinka --- 24 carpetas, 146 audios, 5 videos, 345 documentos PDF, 1 imagen
  • Sapotekano (estirpe)--- 22 carpetas, 7 audios, 1 videos, 45 documentos PDF
  • Popoloka de San Felipe Otlaltepec --- 17 carpetas, 224 audios, 70 documentos PDF
  • Sapoteko de Miahuatlán/Cuixtla --- 11 carpetas, 24 audios, 24 documentos PDF
  • Sapoteko de Zoogocho --- 9 carpetas, 40 audios, 1 video, 37 documentos PDF
  • Iskateko --- 6 carpetas, 13 audios
  • Sapoteko de Amatlán --- 2 carpetas, 4 documentos PDF, 1 imagen
  • Popolokano (estirpe) --- 2 carpetas, 47 documentos PDF
  • Otomangue (familia) --- 1 carpetas, 4 documentos PDF
Idiomas totonakos:
  • Tepewa de Huehuetla --- 13 carpetas, 57 audios, 2 videos, 93 documentos PDF
  • Totonako de la Sierra --- 11 carpetas, 44 audios, 1 video, 6 documentos PDF
  • Totonakano (familia) --- 6 carpetas, 63 documentos PDF
Idiomas yuto-nawas:
  • Nawa de la Sierra de Zongolica --- 189 carpetas, 225 audios, 75 documentos PDF
  • Nawa del Istmo-Pajapan --- 34 carpetas, 141 audios, 231 documentos PDF
  • Nawa de la Sierra de Puebla --- 28 carpetas, 54 audios, 12 videos, 142 documentos PDF
  • Nawa del Istmo-Mecayapan --- 7 carpetas, 18 audios, 11 documentos PDF
  • Nawa de Tabasco --- 1 carpeta, 4 documentos PDF
Mapas interactivas de Google mostrando las localidades e idiomas presentes en ésta y otras colecciones de Terrence Kaufman en AILLA son disponibles Muchos archivos en esta colección son de Acesso Público y otros son Restringidos. Refiérese a losNiveles de Acceso y las Condiciones de Uso para más información. La digitalización y preservación de esta colección fue apoyado por la Beca No. BCS-1157867 de la National Science Foundation. Cualquier opinión, hallazgos, conclusión o recomendación expresado en estos materiales son de los autores y no reflejan necesariamente los de la National Science Foundation., http://www.albany.edu/ims/pdlma-web/
Quechua and Aymara of Puno by Sandhya Krittika Narayanan
Data collected for dissertation research in the Department of Puno, Peru. Data collected represents the various local dialects of Quechua and Aymara spoken across the various provinces in the Department of Puno, Peru. Collection also features interviews and data recordings collected in the Andean Spanish typical of Quechua-Spanish or Aymara-Spanish bilinguals of the region., Los datos era parte de un investigación de un tesis doctoral sobre el quechua y aymara hablado por el Departamento de Puno, Perú. El quechua y aymara en esta collección representa los varios dialectos de quechua y aymara hablado por las varias provincias en el Departament de Puno. También hay entrevistas y grabaciones en el español andino típico de los quechua-español y aymara-español hablantes de la región.
Quechua Collection of Janis B. Nuckolls
This collection of audio recordings includes examples of ideophones. Most of the resources have restricted access pending review of their contents., Esta colección de grabaciones de audio incluye ejemplos de ideófonos. La mayor parte de los recursos tienen acceso restringido hasta el repaso de sus contenidos.
Rama Language and Culture Project Collection
http://www.turkulka.net/, This collection contains audio recordings in a wide range of genres; photographs; pedagogical materials for teaching the Rama language; and articles by Prof. Grinevald.Funds for archiving this collection were provided by the National Endowment for the Humanities., Esta colección contiene grabaciones de audio en una gran variedad de géneros; fotógrafos; materiales pedagógicos para enseñar la lengua Rama; y articulos por Profesora Grinevald.Fondos para archivar esta colección fueron proporcinado por la National Endowment for the Humanities.
Seri Collection of Steve Marlett
http://www.sil.org/mexico/seri/00i-seri.htm, This collection includes video and audio recordings.Spanish site: http://www.sil.org/mexico/seri/00e-seri.htm, Esta colección incluye grabaciones de video y audio.Sitio en español: http://www.sil.org/mexico/seri/00e-seri.htm
The Shawi Collection of Luis Ulloa
Materials in and about the Shawi language of Loreto, Peru. Materials include myths, personal narratives, and elicitation sessions. This collection is focused on the variety spoken in Santa María de Cahuapanas. This is the focus of Luis Ulloa's doctoral dissertation research., Materiales sobre el idioma de los shawis de Loreto, Perú, enfocándose en el dialecto de Santa María de Cahuapanas. Los materiales incluyen cuentos mitológicos y personales, y también elicitaciones. Este dialecto es el enfoque de las investigaciones que Luis Ulloa está realizando para su tesis doctoral.
Sochiápam Chinantec Whistled Speech Collection of Mark Sicoli
This collection is the result of the Documenting Endangered Languages (DEL) Rapid Response Research Project funded by the National Science Foundation Directorate for Social, Behavioral, & Economic Sciences. It contains video recordings, audio recordings, transcriptions and translation and photos from work carried our in January and November, 2011. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number BCS-1126027. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation., Este acervo resulta del Proyecto de Investigación de Respuesta Rápida de la Documentación de Idiomas Amenazados fundado por la Dirección por las Ciencias Sociales, de Comportamiento y Económicas de la Fundación Nacional para la Ciencia (National Science Foundation). Contiene grabaciones de video y audio, transcripciones, traducciones y fotografías de nuestro trabajo realizado en enero y noviembre del 2011. Este material se basa en trabajo apoyado por la National Science Foundation bajo subvención No. BCS-1126027. Cualquier opinión, hallazgo, conclusió o recomendación expresado en este material son del autor/los autores y no necesariamente reflejan los de la National Science Foundation.
(Socio)Linguistic Documentation of Arutani (Uruak), an almost extinct language of Venezuela and Brazil
COLLECTION FORTHCOMING A set of interviews and ethnographic information concerning the Arutani (Uruak) indigenous group, their history, geographic distribution and language. The collection also includes data from Ninam (a.k.a. Shirián). The materials were collected as part of a Jacobs Research Funds group grant to Rosés Labrada and Chacon. Additional funding for Chacon's field trip came from the University of Brasilia., COLECCIÓN EN PROCESO Una serie de entrevistas e informaciones etnográficas sobre los Arutani (Uruak), su lengua, historia y distribuición geográfica. La colección también incluye datos sobre la lengua Ninam (también conocida como Shirián). Los materiales fueron recolectados durante un proyecto de grupo financiado por el Jacobs Research Funds. La Universidad de Brasilia aportó financiamiento adicional para el viaje de campo de Chacon.
(Socio)Linguistic Documentation of Sapé, an almost extinct language of Southern Venezuela
Materials on Sapé collected as part of an Endangered Languages Fund 2016 Language Legacies project, Materiales sobre el Sapé como parte de un proyecto "Language Legacies" del 2016 del Endangered Languages Fund
Soke Dialect Survey
The Soke Dialect Survey was planned by Roberto Zavala, and Terrence Kaufman as part of the Project for the Documentation of the Languages of MesoAmerica in 2010. The questionnaire for this dialect survey was based on the Linguistic questionnaire for dialect variation research on the languages of Guatemala (Kaufman 1970-1971) and the Linguistic questionnaire for dialect variation research on the Totonac language (Kaufman, McKay and Trechsel, 1994). The Soke (also spelled Zoque) languages is a subgroup of the Mije-Sokean (Mixe-Zoquean) family of languages spoken in southern Mexico. The Soke Dialect Survey concerns itself only with the Chiapas Zoque, Jitotoltec, and Oaxaca Zoque languages and does not contain material related to the Gulf Zoquean languages of Soteapan, Ayapa, or Texistepec. The language varieties represented in this collection have been assigned the following ISO 639-3 codes by Ethnologue:
  • zoh Zoque, Chimalapa
  • zoc Zoque, Copainalá
  • zos Zoque, Francisco León
  • zor Zoque, Rayón
Surveys were taken in the following municipalities In Tabasco:
  • Tapijulapa, Tacotalpa
  • Oxolotán, Tacotalpa
  • Ejido Tomás Garrido, Oxolotán, Tacotalpa
In Oaxaca:
  • Santa Maria Chimapala
  • San Miguel Chimalapa
  • Las Conchas, San Miguel Chimalapa
In Chiapas:
  • Coapilla
  • Simojovel
  • Copoya, Tuxtla Gutiérrez
  • Pantepec
  • Ejido Calido, Jitotol
  • Arenal, Amatán
  • Barrio Siglo XX, Ixhuatán
  • Sombra Carrizal, Huitiupán
  • Nuevo Nicapa
  • Tapilula, San Cristobal de las Casas
  • Vicente Guerrero, Francisco Leon
  • Chapultenango
  • Ocotepec
  • Tapalapa
  • Tecpatán
  • Rayón
  • Nuevo Milenio, Ostuacán
  • Ambar, Ostuacán
These materials were given to AILLA by Terrence Kaufman for digitization and preservation in 2012. Most of these materials were on compact disks, and the original number of each disk can be found in the source note field on this collection's resources. After processing, physical media was returned to Kaufman beginning in May 2018. The collection consists of 30 folders containing 331 audio recordings in WAV or MP3 format, 1 document containing a blank survey questionnaire and 784 images of the towns and people represented in the survey. 29 folders contain all the media (audio, and images) associated with a single set of responses to the dialect survey or metalinguistic interview, though a few long questionnaires are split across two folders. One folder contains a blank copy of the questionnaire used for this project. Many folders contain photographs of the community studied in each questionnaire, however, the subjects of these photographs are not identified, and most of the images are blurry. As of July 2018, there are no transcriptions of any survey responses in the collection. Interactive Google maps showing locations of languages present in this and other Terrence Kaufman collections in AILLA are available All items in this collection are Public Access. Refer to AILLA's Access Levels and Conditions of Use for more information. The Project for the Documentation of the Languages of MesoAmerica Collection contains additional materials on Chimalapa Zoque and Chiapas Zoque as well as other Mixe-Zoquean languages. The San Miguel Chimalapa Zoque Collection of Heidi Johnson contains additional materials on Chimalapa Zoque. The Chiapas Zoque Collection of Daniel Suslak contains additional materials in Chiapas Zoque. The MesoAmerican Languages Collection of Roberto Zavala Maldonado contains additional materials on Chiapas Zoque as well as other Mixe-Zoquean languages. The digitization and preservation of this collection was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. BCS-1157867. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation., La Encuesta Lingüística Soke fue planeado por Roberto Zavala y Terrence Kaufman como parte del Proyecto para la Documentación de las Lenguas de MesoAmérica en 2010. El cuestionario para esta encuesta dialectal se basa en “El cuestionario lingüístico para la investigación de las variaciones dialectales en las lenguas de Guatemala” (Kaufman 1970-1971), el “Cuestionario lingüístico para la investigación de las variaciones dialectales de la lengua totonaca” (Kaufman, McKay and Trechsel, 1994). El soke (zoque) es un subgrupo de la familia mije-sokeana (mixezoque) del sur de México. La Encuesta Lingüística Soke se enfoca en los idiomas del zoque de Chiapas, el jitotolteco, y el zoque de Oaxaca y no contiene materiales acerca del idiomas zoque del Golfo de Soteapan, Ayapa o Texistepec. Se les asignaron a las variedades representadas en esta colección los siguientes códigos ISO 639-3 por el Ethnologue:
  • zoh zoque de Chimalapa
  • zoc zoque de Copainalá
  • zos zoque de Francisco León
  • zor zoque de Rayón
Se recopilaron datos en los siguientes comunidades y municipios De Tabasco:
  • Tapijulapa, Tacotalpa
  • Oxolotán, Tacotalpa
  • Ejido Tomás Garrido, Oxolotán, Tacotalpa
De Oaxaca:
  • Santa Maria Chimapala
  • San Miguel Chimalapa
  • Las Conchas, San Miguel Chimalapa
De Chiapas:
  • Coapilla
  • Simojovel
  • Copoya, Tuxtla Gutiérrez
  • Pantepec
  • Ejido Calido, Jitotol
  • Arenal, Amatán
  • Barrio Siglo XX, Ixhuatán
  • Sombra Carrizal, Huitiupán
  • Nuevo Nicapa
  • Tapilula, San Cristobal de las Casas
  • Vicente Guerrero, Francisco Leon
  • Chapultenango
  • Ocotepec
  • Tapalapa
  • Tecpatán
  • Rayón
  • Nuevo Milenio, Ostuacán
  • Ambar, Ostuacán
Terrence Kaufman entregó estos materiales a AILLA para su digitalización y preservación en 2012. Los materiales estaban en discos compactos, y el número original de cada disco aparece en el campo de nota sobre la fuente en los recursos de esta colección. Después del procesamiento, los materiales físicos se devolvieron a Kaufman a partir de mayo del 2018 La colección consta de 30 carpetas de 331 grabaciones de audio en formato WAV o MP3, 1 documento con un cuestionario en blanco y 784 imágenes de los pueblos y personas representados en la encuesta. La colección tiene 29 carpetas con todos los materiales (audio e imágenes) asociados con un conjunto de respuestas a una encuesta dialectal. Unas encuestas están divididas en dos carpetas. Una carpeta contiene una copia del instrumento de la encuesta en blanco. Muchas carpetas contienen fotografías de la comunidad investigado para cada cuestionario, sin embargo, los sujetos de las fotos están sin identificar y la mayoría de las imágenes son nubladas. Hasta julio de 2018, la colección no cuenta con transcripciones de las respuestas a la encuesta. Mapas interactivas de Google mostrando las localidades e idiomas presentes en ésta y otras colecciones de Terrence Kaufman en AILLA son disponibles Todos los archivos en esta colección son de Acesso Público. Refiérese a losNiveles de Acceso y las Condiciones de Uso para más información. La Colección del Proyecto para la Documentación de las Lenguas de MesoAmérica contiene materiales adicionales acerca del zoque de Chimalapa, el zoque de Chiapas y otros idiomas mixezoques. La Colección de Heidi Johnson del Zoque de San Miguel Chimalapa contiene materiales adicionales acerca del zoque de Chimalapa. La Colección de Daniel Suslak del Zoque de Chiapas contiene materiales adicionales acerca del zoque de Chiapas. La Colección de Lenguas de MesoAmérica de Roberto Zavala Maldonado contiene materiales adicionales acerca del zoque de Chiapas y otros idiomas mixezoques. La digitalización y preservación de esta colección fue apoyado por la Beca No. BCS-1157867 de la National Science Foundation. Cualquier opinión, hallazgos, conclusión o recomendación expresado en estos materiales son de los autores y no reflejan necesariamente los de la National Science Foundation.
South Bolivian Quechua, Spontaneous Speech
https://paris3.academia.edu/AlexisPierrard, Bolivia. Recordings made between 2014 and 2015 in different places of the Bolivian Departments Cochabamba, Oruro, Potosí and Chuquisaca., Bolivia. Grabaciones realizadas entre 2014 y 2017 en distintas regiones de los departamentos de Cochabamba, Oruro, Potosí y Chuquisaca.
The Speech of Children from Cusco and Chuquisaca
http://mamasusan.org/, The data related to this collection (minus any information which identifies participants under age 18 years of age) may be requested from Sue_Kalt@yahoo.com. Our main goal in creating this collection is to document children’s comprehension and production of Quechua (quz, quh) in rural highland Bolivia and Peru, where a continuum of permeation from Spanish can be observed. The secondary goal is to document variation within Cuzco-Collao Quechua, giving special attention to the variety of Quechua spoken in rural Chuquisaca in South Bolivia. An understanding of rural Bolivian variants is essential for producing school materials for South Bolivian children and for preserving an understanding of their cultural heritage. Among the scant documentation of the variety spoken in Chuquisaca is a sizeable vocabulary to be included in a dictionary of Bolivian Quechua in preparation by Dr. Pedro Plaza Martínez, and a pedagogical grammar by Louise Stark, Manuel Segovia Bayo and Felicia Segovia Polo (1971). Variation in Cuzco-Collao affix order and interpretation is also detailed by Simon Van de Kerke in his doctoral dissertation (1996) which includes a morphosyntactic study of the Quechua spoken in the town of Tarata, in close proximity to the highly relexified Cochabamba dialect. Our goal is to study rural and less relexified varieties. According to the most recent Peruvian Census (2007:2.4.1) declaration of Quechua as the language learned in childhood declined 3.3 percent between 1993-2007. Anecdotal evidence indicates a similar trend in Bolivia. Clearly, the rapid loss of a major indigenous language spoken in childhood represents a threat to the vitality of indigenous cultural transmission in the region as well as a major setback for humankind’s understanding of child first and second anguage acquisition, bilingualism and language contact. Despite the fact that there are hundreds of thousands of speakers of Cuzco-Collao Quechua, only a handful of published studies of Andean children’s grammar focus on their L1 grammar, and virtually all of these focus on Peruvian children, leaving a serious gap in documentation of indigenous children’s language. Intellectual Merit: A major strength of this project stems from our cultivation of a broadening network of partnerships with rural native speaker community members, indigenous linguists, teachers in rural schools, and teacher educators in both Bolivia and Peru. Leaders in rural communities are divided as to the value of their native language and culture; many see adoption of Spanish as the only road out of extreme poverty and devastation produced by environmental disturbances. Devaluation of the native language often begins at school, despite commitments by the governments of both Bolivia and Peru to institute native language instruction. A network of individuals dedicated to reversing that trend is affiliated with the Programa de Formación en Educación Intercultural Bilingüe at the Universidad Mayor San Simón, Cochabamba, Bolivia and with indigenous organizations as well as governmental and non-governmental organizations in their home countries of Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador, Colombia, Chile and Argentina. Our collaborative children’s language documentation project will enable this network to grow, while leaving tangible products of use for scientific inquiry and language revitalization efforts. This typologically interesting sample of children’s language also allows researchers to illuminate current theoretical questions about second language acquisition and bilingualism, language contact and change. Broader Impacts: Our intention is to benefit academic and non-academic communities by creating an accessible archive of rural children’s native language data. Our team also received a revitalization seed grant from the Foundation for Endangered Languages in 2010 and produced its first module (Yachay q’ipi) in August of that year, found and actively downloaded by Andean teachers free of charge at Mamasusan.org. Curriculum materials and educational activities in the native language have the potential to directly extend the life of the language, and serve as a model for other linguistic research projects involving the empowerment of speech communities. Funding for activities related to this collection: These data were collected in July-September, 2009 through the generous hospitality and collaboration of the four participating communities and individuals named as participants in the study. At that time we had no outside funding. An earlier pilot study was carried out concurrent with an NEH Andean Worlds Seminar Fellowship awarded to Susan Kalt in 2008, with conference travel awards to Susan Kalt from Roxbury Community College in 2008 and 2010, and small private donations to Susan Kalt and Project Yachay Q’ipi in 2010 and 2011. Continued funding came from a Foundation for Endangered Languages seed grant awarded to Susan Kalt and Project Yachay Q’ipi in 2010, and from a National Endowment for the Humanities Documenting Endangered Languages Fellowship awarded to Susan Kalt from 2011-12 (FN-50091-11). Collection contents: 1) Interviews of 104 children and 6 adults MUL028R001 - MUL028R110 each contain: a) videotaped interview, audio of same interview b) a hand-written record of sentence comprehension data (picture selections) c) transcription, interlinear analysis and free translation to Spanish of the interviews in which the participants describe 28 closely related pictures (picture descriptions) d) Some interviews also included a participant-created narrative based on a six-frame comic strip called the duck story. For these, we provide a transcription, interlinear analysis and free translation to Spanish and English. 2) Set of pictures and six-frame comic strip which were discussed in the interviews - MUL028R111 3) Transcription key for picture description task (Quechua, Spanish) - MUL028R112 4) Trilingual gloss legend for comic strip narration task (Quechua, Spanish, English) – LeyendaGlosasTrilingue.pdf 5) Method summary - MUL028R116 6) Written consent from authorities related to each participating community - MUL028R114. Videotaped consent from leaders in Ccotatóclla, Peru - MUL028R041I002, MUL028R041I005, and MUL028R043I002. Audiotaped consent from leaders in Collakamani, Bolivia - MUL028R115. Additional publications related to these data and communities are found at www.Mamasusan.org., Los datos relacionados a esta colección (menos cualquier información que identifique a participantes menores 18 años de edad) se pueden solicitar a Sue_Kalt@yahoo.com. Nuestro objetivo principal al crear esta colección es estudiar y documentar la comprensión y producción del quechua (quh, quz) en tierras altas y rurales de Bolivia y Perú, en donde se puede observar un contínuum de permeación del castellano al quechua. El objetivo secundario es documentar la variación dentro del quechua cusco-collao, haciendo hincapié en la variedad de Chuquisaca. Es esencial entender los variantes rurales y menos relexificados bolivianos para producir materiales curriculares adecuados al niño sur boliviano y para preservar conocimiento de su herencia cultural. Entre la escasa documentación de la variedad hablada en Chuquisaca se encuentra un vocabulario de buen tamaño que se va a incluir en un diccionario del runasimi boliviano preparado por Dr. Pedro Plaza Martínez, y una ramática pedagógica por Louise Stark, Manuel Segovia Bayo and Felicia Segovia Polo (1971). Las variaciones en el orden y la interpretación de sufijos se detallan en la tésis doctoral de Simón van de Kerke (1996) que incluye un estudio morfosintáctico del quechua hablado en el pueblo de Tarata, cerca al dialecto sumamente relexificado de Cochabamba. Nuestra meta es estudiar variedades rurales y menos relexificadas. De acuerdo al censo peruano más reciente (2007:2.4.1) la declaración del quechua como idioma aprendido en la niñez disminuyó 3.3 por ciento entre 1993-2007. Se indica una tendencia similar entre la evidencia anecdotal boliviana. Consta que la pérdida rápida de un idioma indígena infantil de tanta importancia representa una amenaza a la vitalidad de la trasmisión cultural de la región tanto como un retraso para que la humanidad entienda la adquisición de idiomas primarias y secundarias, el bilingüismo y el contacto entre idiomas. A pesar de que hay cientos de miles de hablantes del quechua cusco-collao, se pueden contar en una mano los estudios de gramática del L1 de los niños andinos; virtualmente todos estos estudios son peruanos, dejando un vacío serio para la documentación de los idiomas indígenas infantiles. Mérito intelectual: Un aspecto fuerte de este proyecto se basa en la cultivación de una red de colaboración con miembros de comunidades rurales, lingüistas indígenas, maestros rurales y educadores de docentes en Bolivia y Perú. Los líderes de comunidades rurales no están todos de acuerdo acerca del valor de su idioma y cultura nativos; muchos ven la asimilación al castellano como la única salida a la pobreza extrema y la destrucción medioambiental. La desvalorización del idioma materno muchas veces empieza con la escuela, a pesar de los compromisos de los gobiernos peruano y boliviano para instituir la enseñanza en idiomas originarios. Hay una red de personas comprometidas a reversar esa tendencia; se afilian al Programa de formación en educación intercultural bilingüe para los países andinos (ProEIBAndes) en la Universidad Mayor San Simón, Cochabamba, Bolivia y con organizaciones indígenas, gubernamentales y no gubernamentales en los países de Perú, Bolivia, Colombia, Chile, Argentina y Ecuador. Nuestro proyecto de documentación y estudio de gramática infantil permitirá que crezca esta red de personas, y dejará productos tangibles de uso para las investigaciones científicas y para los esfuerzos de revitalización. Esta muestra de idioma infantil, que es de interés tipológico, permitirá a los investigadores que iluminen preguntas teóricas actuales sobre la adquisición de segundas lenguas y el bilingüismo, el contacto entre idiomas y su evolución. Impacto esperado: Nuestra intención es beneficiar a las comunidades académicas y no-académicas por la creación de un archivo accesible de datos de idioma infantil originario rural. Además de este archivo, nuestro equipo de trabajo recibió una beca semilla de revitalización de la Fundación para idiomas en peligro, Londres y produjo su primer módulo (Yachay q’ipi) en agosto de 2010, que se encuentra y se descarga gratis en Mamasusan.org. Los materiales curriculares en el idioma materno brindan la posibilidad de extender directamente a la vida del idioma, y sirven de modelo para otros proyectos de investigación lingüística cuya meta es empoderar a las comunidades originarias. Fondos para las actividades relacionadas a esta colección: Estos datos se recaudaron entre Julio y septiembre, 2009 gracias a la hospitalaria colaboración generosa de las cuatro comunidades participantes y de los individuos nombrados en el estudio. En 2009 no tuvimos fundos ajenos. Un estudio previo se cumplió concurrente con una beca a Susan Kalt por medio del National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Andean Worlds Seminar, 2008, con colaboración de Roxbury Community College en 2008 y 2010 para viajes y conferencias. Recibimos pequeñas colaboraciones privadas a nombre de Susan Kalt y Proyecto Yachay Q’ipi en 2010 y 2011. Continuamos con una beca semilla del Foundation for Endangered Languages a Susan Kalt y Proyecto Yachay Q’ipi en 2010. Agradecemos también una beca del National Endowment for the Humanities Documenting Endangered Languages Fellowship a nombre de Susan Kalt de 2011-12 (FN-50091-11). Contenidos de la colección: 1) Entrevistas a 104 niños y 6 adultos MUL028R001 - MUL028R110, contiene cada uno: a) entrevista videograbada b) un record manual sobre comprensión de frases (selección de dibujos) c) transcritos con análisis y traducción libre al castellano de las entrevistas en que los participantes describen 28 dibujos relacionados entre sí Algunas de las entrevistas también incluyeron una narración de cuento a base de una historieta en dibujo. 2) El juego de dibujos que se conversaron en cada entrevista - MUL028R111 3) Clave de transcripción (quechua, castellano) - MUL028R112 4) Leyenda de glosas trilingüe que empleamos para las narraciones (quechua, castellano, inglés) – LeyendaGlosasTrilingue.pdf 5) Resumen de metodología - MUL028R116 6) Permiso escrito de autoridades relacionadas con cada comunidad - MUL028R114. Permiso videograbado de líderes comunales en Ccotatóclla, Perú - MUL028R041I002, MUL028R041I005, y MUL028R043I002. Permiso audiograbado de líderes en Collakamani, Bolivia - MUL028R115. Las publicaciones adicionales relacionadas a estos datos y estas comunidades se encuentran en el sitio www.Mamasusan.org.
Survey of the Indigenous Languages of Mexico
http://www.colmex.mx/alim/, This collection contains some of the recordings that were made as part of the ALIM survey of Mexican Indian languages. There are typically three short audio recordings for each language: a phonological elicitation, a narrative text, and a conversation between two native speakers., Esta colección contiene algunas de la grabaciones que fueron hecho como parte de la encuesta de lenguas indígenas de Mexico de ALIM. Tipicamente, hay tres grabaciones cortas de audio para cada lengua: una elicitación fonológica, un texto narrativo, y una conversación entre dos hablantes naturales.
The Survey of Zapotec and Chatino Languages Collection
Zapotec-Chatino is a diverse language family with a 2500-year history involving the earliest writing and State-level social organization in the Western Hemisphere. Currently several Zapotec-Chatino languages have gone extinct only within the last generation and more than half of this family will be lost in the next generation. The work of the Documenting Endangered Languages (DEL) project "Preserving and Enhancing Access to the Survey of Zapotec and Chatino Languages" (2013-2016) supported by the National Science Foundation ensured that the extensive media and transcription files of the Zapotec and Chatino Survey are permanently preserved in AILLA, providing free online dissemination that makes them discoverable and accessible for scholarly and educational purposes. Between 2007 and 2010, the Zapotec and Chatino Survey funded by The National Institute of Indigenous Languages of Mexico (INALI) and conducted under the auspices of the Project for the Documentation of the Languages of Meso-America (PDLMA) documented the languages spoken in 104 towns of Oaxaca, Mexico. In response to the decline of cultural knowledge through loss of these languages, young Zapotec and Chatino speakers applied a linguistic survey and transcribed the results. Without the work of the DEL project that funded the enhancement and archiving of the survey materials, that documentation would have remained beyond access for scholars and community members. The The Survey of Zapotec and Chatino Languages Collection includes over 300,000 recorded and transcribed utterances into a greater than one million word corpus containing thousands of vocabulary items and hundreds of grammatical patterns. The corpus is applicable to researching multiple levels of linguistic structure with potential for comparative linguistic study, through which we can gain insights into human cognition and into languages and cultures of ancient America and can be used for language maintenance efforts in Zapotec-Chatino communities and for education on language endangerment. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. BCS-1263671. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation. The collection of much of the data in this collection was supported by the National Institute of Indigenous Languages of Mexico [INALI]. Interactive Google maps showing locations of languages present in this and other Terrence Kaufman collections in AILLA are available , Zapoteco-Chatino es una diversa familia lingüística con una historia de 2500 años e incluye la escritura y organización social al nivel del estado más tempranas en el hemisferio occidental. Hoy en día [2013] unos idiomas zapoteco-chatinos se dejaron de hablar solo en la generación más reciente y más que la mitad de la familia se perderá en la próxima generación. El trabajo del proyecto del programa "Preserving and Enhancing Access to the Survey of Zapotec and Chatino Languages" [Preservar y Mejorar Acceso a la Encuesta de Idiomas Zapotecos y Chatinos] (2013-2016) del Documenting Endangered Languages [Documentar Idiomas Amenazadas], apoyado por la National Science Foundation [Fundación Nacional de la Ciencia de Estados Unidos] aseguró que la gran cantidad de archivos de medios y transcripciones de la encuesta de idiomas zapotecos y chatinos sean preservados permanentemente en AILLA, proporcionando la diseminación gratuita en el internet que facilita su localización y acceso por fines académicos y pedagógicos. Entre 2007 y 2010, La Encuesta de Idiomas Zapotecos y Chatinos apoyado por el Instituto Nacional de Lenguas Indígenas de México [INALI] y realizado bajo los auspicios del Proyecto para la Documentación de las Lenguas de MesoAmérica (PDLMA) documentó los idiomas hablados en 104 pueblos de Oaxaca, México. Como respuesta al declive de conocimiento cultural debido a la pérdida de estos idiomas, jóvenes hablantes de idiomas zapotecos y chatinos aplicaron una encuesta lingüística y transcribieron los resultados. Sin el trabajo de este proyecto que financió el mejoramiento y archivación de estos materiales, la documentación habría permanecido fuera del alcance de académicos y miembros de las comunidades. La Colección de la Encuesta de Idiomas Zapotecos y Chatinos incluye más que 300,000 enunciados grabados y transcritos que forma un corpus de más que un millón de palabras e incluye miles de ítems de vocabulario y centenates de patrones gramaticales. Este corpus se puede aplicar a la investigación de múltiples niveles de estructura lingüística y tiene potencial para la investigación lingüística comparativa, mediante el cual se puede encontrar hallazgos en la cognición humana y las lenguas y culturas de la América antigua, y se pueden utilizar por los esfuerzos de mantención de idiomas en comunidades zapotecas y chatinas y la educación acerca de las lenguas amenazadas. Este material se basa en trabajo apoyado por la National Science Foundation [Fundación Nacional de la Ciencia de Estados Unidos] bajo la subvención BCS-1263671. Cualquier opinión, hallazgo, conclusión o recomendación expresada en este material es del autor y no necesariamente reflejan los de la National Science Foundation. La recopilación de la mayoría de los datos en esta colección fue apoyado por el Instituto Nacional de Lenguas Indígenas de México [INALI]. Mapas interactivas de Google mostrando las localidades e idiomas presentes en ésta y otras colecciones de Terrence Kaufman en AILLA son disponibles
Teaching Macuiltianguis Zapotec Collection of Kate Riestenberg and Grupo Cultural Tagayu'
kateriestenberg.com, A set of video and audio recordings from Zapotec classes that took place at the Centro de Aprendizaje (Learning Center) in San Pablo Macuiltianguis, Oaxaca, Mexico between 2015 and 2016 under the direction of Mtra. Raquel Eufemia Cruz Manzano and the Grupo Cultural Tagayu'. The participants in the classes were mosty children from the community, ages 7-12, who were learning Zapotec as beginners. The collection includes materials used for assessing students' Zapotec learning in terms of tone, vocabulary, and general proficiency. There are also additional audio recordings created with speakers for the purpose of investigating the phonetic and phonological characteristics of this variety of Zapotec. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number BCS-1451687. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation., Una colección de grabaciones de video y audio de las clases de lengua zapoteca que se llevaron a cabo en el Centro de Aprendizaje de San Pablo Macuiltianguis, Oaxaca, México, entre 2015 y 2016, bajo la dirección de Mtra. Raquel Eufemia Cruz Manzano y el Grupo Cultural Tagayu '. La mayoría de los participantes en las clases eran niños de la comunidad, de 7 a 12 años de edad, que estaban aprendiendo el zapoteco al nivel principiante. La colección incluye materiales utilizados para evaluar el aprendizaje de los alumnos en términos de tono, vocabulario y dominio general. También hay grabaciones de audio creadas con hablantes nativos con el fin de investigar las características fonéticas y fonológicas de esta variante de zapoteco. Este material se basa en un proyecto respaldado por la National Science Foundation (Número de Subvención BCS-1451687). Todas las opiniones, hallazgos y conclusiones o recomendaciones expresadas en este material son las del autor y no necesariamente reflejan los puntos de vista de la National Science Foundation.
Teko Collection of Françoise Rose
http://www.ddl.ish-lyon.cnrs.fr/Rose, The Teko collection is made of recordings of Emerillon/Teko texts collected in French Guiana between 1999 and 2004., La colección teko está compuesta de grabaciones de textos Emerillion/Teko coleccionados en Guyana Francesa entre 1999 y 2004.
Toba Collection of Harriet E. Manelis Klein
At present, this collection consists of an audio recording of a text discussed in Klein, Harriet. (1986). "Styles of Toba discourse." In Joel Sherzer and Greg Urban, eds., Native South American Discourse. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. pp. 213-236., Actualmente, esta colección consiste de una grabación de audio de un texto discutido en Klein, Harriet. (1986). "Styles of Toba discourse." In Joel Sherzer and Greg Urban, eds., Native South American Discourse. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. pp. 213-236.
Tojol-ab'al Collection of José Gómez Cruz
This recording was made in the indigenous language Tojolab'al of González de León (napité), Las Maragaritas. This collection is part of the investigation corpus of the Master Thesis about the objectives in Tojolab'al. Recorded in August 12, 2008., Esta grabación se realizó en la lengua tojol-ab'al de González de León (napité), Las Maragaritas. La colección forma parte del corpus de investigación de la Tesis de Maestría sobre Los adjetivos en tojol-ab'al. Grabado en 12 de agosto de 2008., Ja a'tel iti' k'ulxel grabar b'a k'umal tojol-ab'al sb'a komon Gonzalez de León, sb'a Schonab'il Margaritas. Ja tsome' a'tel iti' ja mak'uni' sok t'usan ja stojb'esjel ja a'tel sb'il tesis b'a mesestría sb'ilan ja adjetibos jumasa' ja b'a tojol-ab'al. K'ulxi grabar s b'a sk'aujil lajchawe' yajtab'il yixawil agosto sb'a jab'ab'il 2008.
Tojolab'al Collection of the SSSAT
http://sssat.missouri.edu, TOJ_overview1.pdf: Is an overview of the town names TOJ_overview2.pdf: Is an overview of the speakers TOJ_overview3.pdf: Is an overview of the genres
Totonac-Tepehua Dialect Survey
The Totonac-Tepehua Dialect Survey (2003-2005) was planned by Carolyn MacKay, Frank Trechsel, and Terrence Kaufman. The questionnaire was administered and recorded by Benigno Robles Reyes in a total of 30 Totonac-speaking towns and 1 Tepehua-speaking town. During the summers of 2004 and 2005, the recorded surveys were transcribed by José Santiago and Miguel Gerónimo, both of whom are Totonac speakers from Filomeno Mata, Veracruz. Interactive Google maps showing locations of languages present in this and other Terrence Kaufman collections in AILLA are available The audio files in this collection are unrestricted; however, the transcription files will remain restricted while MacKay & Trechsel check the accuracy of the transcriptions and data. The digitization and preservation of this collection was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. BCS-1157867. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation., La Encuesta Lingüística de Totonaco-Tepehua (2003-2005) fue planeado por Carolyn MacKay, Frank Trechsel y Terrence Kaufman. El cuestionario fue administrado y grabado por Benigno Robles Reyes en 30 comunidades de habla totonaco y en 1 comunidad de habla tepehua. Durante los veranos de 2004 y 2005, José Santiago y Miguel Gerónimo, ambos de Filomeno Mata, Veracruz, transcribieron las grabaciones. Ambos son hablantes del totonaco de Filomeno Mata, Veracruz. Mapas interactivas de Google mostrando las localidades e idiomas presentes en ésta y otras colecciones de Terrence Kaufman en AILLA son disponibles Los archivos de audio en esta colección no están restringidos; sin embargo, los archivos de transcripción permanecerán restringidos mientras que MacKay y Trechsel comprueben la exactitud de los datos y transcripciones. La digitalización y preservación de esta colección fue apoyado por la Beca No. BCS-1157867 de la National Science Foundation. Cualquier opinión, hallazgos, conclusión o recomendación expresado en estos materiales son de los autores y no reflejan necesariamente los de la National Science Foundation.
Tseltal Documentation Project of Gilles Polian
http://tseltaltokal.org, This project aims to document Tseltal language (Mayan language spoken in Chiapas, Mexico, by more than 300.000 speakers) in all its diversity, covering as many dialects, registers and speech genres as possible. It has been funded by two ELDP grants, both hosted at CIESAS-Sureste, in Chiapas: 1) "Documentation of Central Tseltal: creation of a broad corpus for multiple uses" (january-june 2006; see http://www.hrelp.org/grants/projects/index.php?projid=87) 2) "Documenting endangered Tseltal cultural activities: an Ethnographic and Discursive Audiovisual Corpus" (july 2007-june 2010; see http://www.hrelp.org/grants/projects/index.php?projid=138), Este proyecto tiene como objetivo documentar la lengua tseltal (lengua maya hablada en Chiapas, México, por más de 300.000 hablantes) en toda su diversidad, cubriendo el mayor número posible de variantes dialectales, registros y géneros de habla. Ha sido financiado por dos becas de ELDP, ambas hospedadas en el CIESAS-Sureste en Chiapas: 1) "Documentación del tseltal central: creación de un corpus amplio para múltiples usos (enero-junio 2006; véase http://www.hrelp.org/grants/projects/index.php?projid=87) 2) "Documentación de actividades culturales tseltales amenazadas: un corpus audiovisual etnográfico y discursivo" (julio 2007-junio 2010; véase http://www.hrelp.org/grants/projects/index.php?projid=138)
The Tuparí corpus by Adam Singerman
https://www.adamsingerman.com/, This corpus, which will be updated in 2020 and 2021, contains extensive materials on the Tuparí language collected by Singerman. All of the material in the corpus (except for clips from WhatsApp) was collected in the state of Rondônia, where the Tuparí reside. The collection of this material has been supported by the National Science Foundation's Documenting Endangered Languages Program (award #1563228) and by two grants from the Jacobs Research Funds (Bellingham, WA): an Individual Research Grant and a Kinkade Grant. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation or of the Jacobs Research Funds., Este corpus, que será actualizado en 2020 y 2021, contiene materiales extensos en el idioma tuparí recopilados por Singerman. Todo el material menos los archivos de WhatsApp fueron recopilados en el estado de Rondonia, donde residen los tuparí. Esta colección ha sido apoyada por una beca (#1563228) del programa Documenting Endangered Languages de la National Science Foundation y dos becas de Jacobs Research Funds (Bellingham, WA): una beca de investigación individual y una beca Kinkade. Cualquier opinión, hallazgos, conclusión o recomendación expresado son de los autores y no necesariamente reflejan los de la National Science Foundation o Jacobs Research Funds.
Tu'un Savi (Mixtec) in California
Annotations, audio recordings of word lists and narratives, audio and video recordings of conversations, and grammar sketches of the Mixteco languages of Tlahuapa, Guerrero; San Martín Peras, Oaxaca; and San Martín Duraznos, Oaxaca. The materials were collected in California by various members of the project. The Mixtec varieties of the following communities were collected during the years in parentheses: Tlahuapa, Guerrero Mixtec (2015-2017) San Martín Peras, Oaxaca Mixtec (2016-2017) San Martín Duraznos, Oaxaca Mixtec (2017), Annotaciones, grabaciones de audio de listas de palabras y textos, grabaciones de audio y video de conversaciones, y busquejos gramaticales en las variantes del mixteco de Tlahuapa, Guerrero; San Martín Peras, Oaxaca; y San Martín Duraznos, Oaxaca. Los materiales fueron recogidos en California por varios miembros del proyecto. Las siguientes variantes del mixteco fueron recopilados durante los años indicados: Mixteco de Tlahuapa, Guerrero (2015-2017) Mixteco de San Martín Peras, Oaxaca (2016-2017) Mixteco de San Martín Duraznos, Oaxaca (2017)
Tzotzil Collection of John Haviland
http://www.anthro.ucsd.edu/~jhaviland/, This is a large collection of video and audio recordings created from the 1970's to the present decade. Funds for archiving this collection were provided by the National Endowment for the Humanities., Esta es una colección grande de grabaciones de video y audio creado desde los 1970's hasta en la decada presente. Fondos para archivar esta colección fueron proporcinado por la National Endowment for the Humanities.
Uspanteko Collection of Ryan Bennett and Robert Henderson
https://panteko.us/, Materials in and about Uspanteko, a K'ichean-branch Mayan language of Guatemala. The materials reflect a range of different elicitation tasks aimed at the collection of data on word- and phrase-level prosody in the language, as well as more general documentation of Uspanteko language and culture. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Numbers BCS-1551043 and BCS-1551666. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation., Materiales en y acerca del idioma Uspanteko, un idioma Mayan de Guatemala que pertenece a la rama K'icheana. Las materiales reflejan varios metodos de elicitación con la meta de recopilar datos sobre la prosódia del idioma a los niveles de la palabra y la frase, y también la documentación general del idioma Uspanteko y la cultura uspanteka. Este material se basa en trabajo apoyado por la National Science Foundation bajo las subvenciones No. BCS-1551043 y No. BCS-1551666. Cualquier opinión, hallazgo, conclusión o recomendación expresado en este material son del autor/los autores y no necesariamente reflejan los de la National Science Foundation.
The Works of Thomas Cedric Smith-Stark
This collection consists of the published and unpublished writings, presentations, and handouts of Thomas Cedric Smith Stark, who work at the Colegio de México for 28 years., Esta colección consta de las obras, ponencias y volantes publicados y no publicados de Thomas Cedric Smith Stark, que trabajó en el Colegio de México por 28 años.
Wounaan Oral Traditions and Music, Lapovsky Kennedy Collection, 1964-1966
Description of the collection made by the depositor: "All the stories and music in this collection were recorded between 1964 and 1966 by myself, Elizabeth Lapovsky Kennedy (Liz), assisted by my husband of that time, Perry Kennedy. I was doing field work for my doctoral dissertation, a holistic ethnography of the Wounaan people entitled, "The Waunan of the Siguirisúa River: A Study of Individual Autonomy and Social Responsibility with Special Reference to Economic Aspects." For recordings done almost 50 years ago they are in excellent condition. However, sometimes my record keeping about the “who,” “when” and “where” of storytelling was less than perfect, leaving a few holes in the metadata. (The missing information is probably embedded in my field notes which I didn’t have time to access.) Although the majority of field work time was spent on the Siguirisúa River, the total population of which numbered 249 people, living in 22 houses dispersed along the length of the river, in January 1965, we also spent a couple of months on the Docampadó river. I am including a section entitled , “Conditions of field work,” from my dissertation Introduction that gives a description of field work written closer to the time. Wounaan told stories at the end of the day as people were preparing for sleep. Often they would start out gathered around the story teller, and would leave if sleep called before the story was finished. My recollection is that storytelling was a regular occurrence. When we discovered that, we encouraged it for our recordings. Wounaan were happy to oblige us as they themselves really enjoyed the storytelling. No recordings of stories were staged in advance. They were told by people present in a house, when their telling suited Wounaan schedules. They could have a small audience in a small house or a large audience in a large house with visitors. We collected 209 stories. Since we lived in every house on the Siguirisúa river for at least a short period of time, we had a variety of different story tellers from the Siguirisúa but also some from the Docampadó, 36 in all, for which we only have names for 27. (The reason we are missing 9 names is due to problems in my record keeping, not to narrators’ desire to remain anonymous.) We identified narrators from the index on the tape box , from my census, from a list of photographs and sometimes Perry announced the story teller before he/she began. For narrators whose names are missing, we identify them as narrator 1, 2, 3, so that those listening to the stories today can ascertain whether this is a different unknown narrator. For some people we only have their first name, because in general we were following good social science practice of the time of not fully identifying narrators. When preparing the collection I added last names from my memory, when I could. (We encourage anyone who knows the last name to contact AILLA. For a few people we only had a name and no identifying characteristics.) The majority of story tellers were men, only 3 women. They were of all ages, although unquestionably some of the elder men, such as Luis Angel Chamarra, were known for their story telling ability, while others were just learning. All of the story tellers seemed to me to be native speakers of Wounaan meu with some knowledge of Spanish. However, it is possible that Embera was spoken at home for some and I didn’t pick this up. For instance, I know that at least one native Embera speaking woman was married to a native Wounaan speaker and lived on the river with him. I did not follow up on the linguistic impact of this arrangement. Also at the time I did not know anything about distinct dialects among Wounaan. So information given under “subject community” is provided based on the knowledge of contemporary Wounaan language experts. This topic on the division between those from the creeks (Dösigpien) and the main and lower San Juan River (Döcharpien) is a bit controversial: everyone acknowledges it exists, but define it a bit differently depending on where they are from. Part of the difficulty is that to classify someone from the main San Juan River (Döcharpien) is essentially denying that the creeks are part of that river, which itself holds much cultural currency as the "true river" of Wounaan homelands. Regardless, the division does carry linguistic and cultural characteristics that PTOW (Proyecto Tradición Oral Wounaan) staff felt were important to recognize in the meta data. (See Julia Velasquez’ Runk’s dissertation , “And the Creator Began to Carve Us of Cocobolo’: Culture, History, Forest Ecology, and Conservation among Wounaan in Eastern Panama,” for further information.) In the mid-1960s, Wounaan looked forward to stories and were actively engaged in the process. It was expected that the audience would interact with the story teller by making comments that show their interest and involvement and help move the story along. Comments came from young people as well as adults, women as well as men. (We have almost no data on the names of the commentators in this collection.) The story teller never got distracted by the comments, but rather acknowledged them when appropriate and kept moving on. I did not learn until I was working with Proyecto Tradición Oral Wounaan, (Project of Wounaan Oral Tradition) PTOW, that is, the team of Wounaan linguists on the NSF DEL grant, “Documenting Wounaan meu,” for which I am co PI, that many comments on the Siguirisúa and Docampadó stories were bawdy, or what present day Wounaan language experts, living in Panama, referred to in Spanish as having “palabras rojas.” In truth I had no idea that this was the case during the actual recording of the stories, even though I had an elementary grasp of Wounaan meu. Even more interesting to me, is that two pairs of Wounaan, who had been particularly helpful as language teachers on the river, and who accompanied us to Cali to work with me to transcribe stories from the recordings, never mentioned the bawdiness of the comments. They focused on transcribing the story line as developed by the story teller, and not the comments. This is a wonderful example of what can be missed if a researcher is not completely fluent in the language. The bawdy stories presented several problems for transcribing, translating and archiving this collection. The contemporary Wounaan language experts, working with PTOW on the NSF DEL Grant, were offended by the bawdy comments, and also didn’t want their children listening to them. Their first reaction was to not transcribe the comments. This is likely related to the fact that they have all been evangelized. Yet they also were aware of the contradiction that they wanted to preserve the language and customs of their ancestors, and yet wanted to ignore what they didn’t like. After much discussion the solution was to produce two transcriptions and translations of each story, one with comments and one without. Children under 12 would not receive passwords for the stories with comments, and others would have the choice of listening to the stories with comments or not. The preparation of the collection for deposit was done as part of the NSF grant, although I paid for the digitizing of the tapes and some of the indexing help. The indexing required the help of a fluent Wounaan speaker to accurately record the beginning and end of each story, to write the title of the stories in Spanish and Wounaan meu, and to write a brief summary of each story in Woounaan meu and Spanish. This knowledge was combined with my knowledge about the story teller, the location of the recording, etc. Diego Watico did the titles and summaries for the original indexing of tapes 1-6, and then Chindío Peña Ismare as part of PTOW reviewed that indexing and did the titles and summaries for stories and music on tape 7, 20, 21, 22, A & B and 31-34, while Toñio Peña Conquista worked on tapes 35-39. Chindío’s indexing was particularly valuable, because he had grown up on a small river, Pepecorro whose headwaters were quite close to the Docampadó. (The Pepecorro is a tributary of the Pimía, that flowed into a larger River, the Bicordó, that flowed into the major San Juan River.) He remembered some of the people and could recognize their voices. If our memories are in disagreement I include both in the metadata. Ping Pong Media of Tucson did the digitizing of the original reel to reel tapes.(See section F of the Depositor’s packet for more detail on equipment.) Bryan James Gordon, graduate student in the joint Linguistics/Anthropology program at the U of A and part of the NSF Grant, provided the technical assistance to make these digitized recordings available to Wounaan through Tool Box. Julia Velasquez Runk as lead PI for the project and dedicated scholar about Wounaan history and culture was an invaluable resource. And finally Jacque Lamb was my assistant in creating the Excel Spread sheet of metadata for the 209 stories and 53 pieces of music. She was invaluable in her knowledge of Excel and her attention to detail." See the PDF file below entitled "Kennedy_conditions_of_fieldwork.pdf" for more information about this project., Esta colección está en proceso de ser archivado. Descripción de la colección hechoa por la depositora: "Todos los cuentos y cantos en esta colección fueron grabados entre los años 1964 y 1966 por mí, Elizabeth Lapovsky Kennedy (Liz), asistida por mi marido en esos tiempos, Perry Kennedy. Yo estaba haciendo trabajo de campo para mi tesis doctoral, una etnografía completa de la gente Wounaan titulada "The Waunan of the Siguirisúa River: A Study of Individual Autonomy and Social Responsibility with Special Reference to Economic Aspects." Por ser grabaciones hechas hace casi 50 años, están en excelente condición. Sin embargo, a veces mis notas de las grabaciones fallan al notar el "quién",'"cuándo", y "dónde" de los recursos, y deja algunos campos vaciós en los metadatos. (Los datos que faltan probablemente están incluidos en mis notas de trabajo de campo los cuáles no pude acceder.) Aunque la mayoría del tiempo de trabajo de campo se ocupó en el río Siguirisúa, con una población total de 249 personas, viviendo en 22 casas a lo largo del río, en enero del 1965, y también pasamos unos dos meses en el río Docampadó. Estoy incluyendo una sección titulada "Condiciones del trabajo de campo" de la introducción de mis tesis doctoral que da una desripción del trabajo de campo escrita más cerca a ese tiempo. Los Wounaan contaban cuentos al fin del día mientras la gente se estaba preparando para dormir. Frecuentemente empezaban rodeando al narrador, y se iban si les daba sueño antes de terminar el cuento. A mi parecer, contaban cuentos comúnmente. Cuando descubrimos esto, animamos a la gente para hacer grabaciones. Los Wounaan estaban contentos de complacernos porque de verdad les gustaba hechar cuentos. Ninguna de las grabaciones fueron hechas predeterminadamente. Fueron contadas por la gente presente en la casa, cuando su narración se acomodaba al horario. Podía haber poca gente escuchando un cuento en una casa pequeÑa, o mucha gente escuchando en una casa grande con huéspedes. Recopilamos 209 cuentos. Como viviamos en cada casa del río Siguirisúa por lo menos un poco de tiempo, tuvimos una variedad de cuentos por una variedad de narradores de Siguirisúa pero también algunos del río Docampadó, 36 en total, de los cuáles tenemos nombres para 27 de ellos. (La razón por la cuál nos faltan 9 nombres es por culpa de que no lo noté en mis datos, y no porque los narradores desearon permanecer anónimos.) Identificamos a los narradores por el índice de da caja de la cinta, por mi ecnso, por una lista de fotos, y a veces porque Perry anunciaba el narrador antes de que comenzara a grabar. Por los narradores que nos faltan, los identificamos como narrador 1, 2, 3 etc., para que los que están escuchando en un futuro pueden determinar si es un narrador diferente o no. Para algunos narradores nada más tenemos los nombres y no los apellidos, porque en general estabamos siguiendo la práctica adecuada de ciencia social de no identificar completamente el narrador. Cuando preparamos la colección, yo agregué los apellidos de memoria, cuando podía. (Animamos a cualquiera que sepa los apellidos a contactar a AILLA. Para algunas personas nada más teníamos un nombre y no características especiales.) La mayoría de los narradores eran hombres, y tan solo tres eran mujeres. Eran de toda clase de edad, aunque sin duda algunos de los mayores como Luis Angel Chamarra eran conocidos por su abilidad de hechar cuentos, mientras que otros narradores tan solo estaban empezando a aprender. Todos los narradores parecían ser hablantes nativos de la lengua wounaan meu, con algo de conocimiento del español. Sin embargo, es posible que se hablaba Embera en algunas casas y no me di cuenta. Por ejemplo, sé que por lo menos una mujer que hablaba Embera estaba juntada con un hablante nativo Wounaan y vivía en el río con él. Yo no investigué el resultado del impacto lingüístico de esta situación. También, en ese tiempo no sabía nada de los dialectos diferentes dentro de los Wounaan. Entonces bajo la información de "comunidad de los sujetos", se provee basado en el conocimiento de los expertos modernos de la lengua wounaan meu. Este tema de la di'visión entre los de las quebradas (Dösigpien) y los del centro y bajo río San Juan (Döcharpien) es un poco controversial: todos reconocen que hay una diferencia, pero la definen de distintas maneras dependiendo de dónde son. Parte de esta dificultad es que al clasificar a alguién como se del centro del río San Juan (Döcharpien) es tambíen negar que las quebradas son parte de ese río, que en sí carga mucha relevancia cultural al ser el río legítimo de los antepasados Wounaan. Sin embargo, esta división lleva características lingüísticas y culturales que los empleados del PTOW (Proyecto Tradición Oral Wounaan) sintieron importantes para reconocer en los metadatos. (Ver la tesis doctoral de Julia Velasquez Runk, "And the Creator Began to Carve Us of Cocobolo’: Culture, History, Forest Ecology, and Conservation among Wounaan in Eastern Panama", para más información acerca de esto.) En los 1960s, los Wounaan se emocionaban por escuchar cuentos y eran activos en el proceso de narración. Era una expectitiva que los oyentes participaran en la narración al hacer comentarios que mostraban interés y participación para ayudar a darle seguimiento a la narración. Comentarios se daban por jovenes tanto como por adultuos, por mujeres y por hombres también. (Tenemos casi nada de información de los nombres de los que comentaban durante las narraciones en esta colección.) El narrador nunca se distraía por los comentarios, pero los reconocía cuando era apropiado y le daba seguimiento a la narración. Yo no me di cuenta hasta que empezé a trabajar con el Proyecto Tradición Oral Wounaan, PTOW, que es el equipo de lingüístas Wounaan en una beca de NSF DEL, "Documentando Wounaan meu", de la cual yo soy la co- invevstigadora principal, que muchos de los comentarios en las grabaciones de los cuentos de Siguirisúa y Docampadó eran irrespetuosos, o palabras que los expertos contemporáneos de la lengua Wounaan meu que viven en Panamá se referían como "palabras rojas". La verdad es que yo no sabía que este era el caso durante la grabación , aunque tenía un concepto básico de la lengua wounaan meu. Se me hace más interesante que dos parejas Wounaan, quienes fueron principalmente valiosos como maestros nuestros de la lengua, y que nos acompañaron a cali a trabajar conmigo en transcribir los cuentos, nunca mencionaron la falta de respeto en los comentarios. Se enfocaban en la transcripción de la narración tal como la desarrollaba el narrador, y no en los comentarios. Este es un ejemplo magnífico de lo que se puede perder si un investigador no es completamente fluido en una lengua. La falta de respeto en los comentarios presentó varios problemas para transcripción, traducción y archivando esta colección. El Wounaan contemporáneo de expertos de la lengua, que trabajan con PTOW en la beca NSF DEL, se ofendieron por los comentarios ofensivos y no querían que sus hijos los escucharan. La primera reacción era no transcribir los comentarios. Esta reacción está probablemente ligada a que todoshan sido evangelizados. Aún, los hablantes tenían en cuenta que era una contradicción de que querían preservar su lengua y cultura de sus ancestros, pero querían ignorar lo que no les gustaba. Después de discutir esto , una solución fue de producir dos transcripciones y traducciones de cada cuento, uno con los comentarios y uno sin los comentarios. Los jóvenes menores de 12 años no recibirían la clave para los cuentos con comentarios, y los demás recibirían la opción de escuchar los cuentos con o sin comentarios. La preparación de la colección para el depósito fue hecha como parte de mi beca de NSF, aunque pagué por cambiar las cintas a formato digital, y con un poco de ayuda con lo índices. La ayuda con los índices requirió la ayuda de un hablante nativo de wounaan meu para grabar detalladamente el comienzo y el fin de cada cuento en wounaan meu y español, y a hacer un breve resumen de cada cuento en wounaan meu y español. este conocimiento fue combinado con mi conocimiento del narrador, el lugar de la grabación, etc. Diego Watico hizo los títulos y resumenes para los índices originales de las cintas 1-6, y después Chindío Peña Ismare como parte de PTOW revisó los índices e hizo los títulos y descripciones de los cuentos y cantos en las cintas 7, 20, 21, 22 A&B, y 31-34, mientras que Toñio Peña Conquista trabajó las cintas 35-39. Los índices de Chindío fueron especialmente valiosos, porque él había crecido en un río pequeño, Pepecorro, cuya cabecera era cerquitas al Docampadó. (El Pepecorro es una afluyente del Pimía, que virtía en un río más grande, el Bicordó, que virtía en el río grande de San Juan.) Él todavía se acordaba de algunos de los narradores y podía reconocer sus voces. Si nuestros recolecciones difieren yo incluyo los dos en los metadatos. Ping Pong Media de Tucson, Arizona convirtió la cinta original a cintas de casetes. (Ver sección F del paquete del depositor para ver más detalles de equipos.) Bryan James Gordon, un estudiante de posgrado en el programa de Lingüística/Antropología en la Universidad de Arizona asistió en ayuda técnica para proveer las grabaciones a los Wounaan a través del programa Tool Box. Julia Velasquez Runk, como investigadora principal del proyecto aportó su conocimiento de la historia y cultura Wounaan valiosamente. Finalmente, Jacque Lamb fue mi asistente al crear la página de Excel de los metadatos para las 209 historias y 53 piezas de música. Fue un gran aporte con su conocimiento del programa Excel y su atención a detalles." Vé el archivo PDF abajo que se llama "Kennedy_conditions_of_fieldwork.pdf" para más información acerca de este proyecto.
Wounaan Oral Traditions, Binder Collection, 1970-1980
This collection of materials is based on recordings made by Ron Binder in the Darien and Panama provinces in eastern Panama during the years 1970 through 1980 when he lived with his family in Arusa, a Wounaan village. These recordings were made primarily as a basis for linguistic analysis and an understanding of Wounaan culture in partial fulfillment of a 10-year contract between SIL International and the Ministry of Eduation (specifically, under the auspices of Patrimonio Histórico, part of INAC—Instituto Nacional de Cultura—and the Min. of Ed. of Panama. Most of the recordings were made in the village of Arusa, but Binder also spent time in many other villages in Panama and Colombia, and some were made during those visits. A great number of the stories were recorded in the village of Capetí (which since has moved downriver and is named Capetuira). Capetí was the site chose for several of the older story tellers to gather for purpose of recording their oral history and and folklore. Their goal was to not only record their early stories, but to determine as much as possible their chronological order—something that had never been done. The practical focus of the work with the Wounaan during the 1970s was linguistic analysis, community development, the publication of primers and other materials in Wounaan meu and literacy with a view towards the development of a multilanguage education program. Work continued in Panama during the 1980s and 1990s with several publications and the completion of the New Testament in the language. In the 2000s work has continued via Skype and periodic trips to Panama by invitation of Wounaan leaders. The focus has been on improved literacy materials and nonprint media in the language., Esta colección se basa en grabaciones realizadas por Ron Binder en las provincias de Darién y Panamá en el este de Panamá durante los 1970 y 1980 mientras vivía con su familia en Arusa, un pueblo wounaan. Estas grabaciones se hicieron primariamente como base de análisis lingüístico y para el conocimiento de la cultura wounaan para cumplir con un contrato de diez años entre SIL International y el Ministerio de Educación (específicamente bajo los auspicios de Partimonio Histórico, parte de INAC-Instituto NAcional de Cultura y el Min. de Ed. de Panamá. La mayoría fueron grabadas en el pueblo de Arusa, pero Binder visitió otras localidades de Panamá y Colombia, y algunas se grabaron durante aquellas visitas. Una gran cantidad de los cuentos son del pueblo de Capetí (que desde entonces se mudo río abajo y se llama Capetuira). Capetí fue el sitio elegido por los cuentacuentos antiguos para juntarse se grabar su historia oral y folclor. Su meta fue no solo grabar su cuentos, pero determinar, hasta fuera posible, su orden cronológico--algo que jamás se ha hecho. El enfoque práctico del trabajo con los Wounaan de los 1970 fue el análisis lingüístico, desarrollo comunitario, y la publicación de materials en wounaan meu y alfabetización con una vista hacia el desarrollo de un programa educativo multilingüe. El trabajo continuó en Panamá durante los 1980 y 1990 con unas publicaciones y el Nuevo Testamento en el idioma. En los 2000 el trabajo ha continuado mediante Skype y visitas periódicas a Panamá a la invitación de líderes wounaan. El enfoque ha sido en el mejoramiento de los materiales de alfabetización y los medios no impresos del idioma.
Wounaan Oral Traditions, Loewen Collection, 1948 - 1958
[As per material provided by Dorothy Joyce Pauls and Gladys Loewen] This collection of materials is based on recordings made by Jacob (Jake) Loewen in Colombia during 1947 to 1958. In December 1947 Loewen moved to Colombia with his wife, Anne, and baby daughter, Gladys (born in 1947). They lived in the Wounaan village of Noanamá, on the San Juan River, in the Chocó Department. Loewen’s assignment in Colombia was to reduce the Wounaan language to writing, and later to study the ten dialects of the Choco language family in Panama and Colombia for Bible translation purposes. They stayed in Colombia for five years until they left on furlough in January 1953. During those five years, daughter Dorothy Joyce (DJ) was born in 1950, and Sharon was born in 1951, both in Andagoya, at the hospital for miners in that town some 4 hours by launch on the San Juan River. During his two-year furlough Jacob Loewen completed his Master’s studies in linguistics at the University of Washington, Seattle. His 1954 Master's thesis on Wounaan meu linguistics is titled “Waunana Grammar: A Descriptive Analysis.” Son William (Bill) was born in 1954 in Chilliwack, BC, Canada. Jacob Loewen’s linguistics work in Colombia continued after his furlough from 1955-1957, and expanded to Panama within a few years. In this period the Loewens and family resided in Cali instead of Noanamá. As part of his assignment Loewen went to the Sambu area of Panama to study their dialect in April-May 1956. After returning from Colombia in 1957 Loewen was involved with the Choco Church program in Panama during the summers-- a 25 year project from 1959-1984 attempting a full generation of culture change within a Christian framework. The family did not accompany Loewen to Panama. Jacob Loewen died in 2006. More information about him and his work can be found with his deposited papers at Fresno Pacific University, see http://library.fresno.edu/files/m104.pdf. It is unclear when Jacob Loewen made these recordings during his residence in Colombia, although it is certain they are from that country (rather than Panama). Loewen gave these recordings to Ronald Binder a number of years ago. Binder mentioned them during planning for the Wounaan Oral Traditions Project in 2008, and project PI Julie Velásquez Runk contacted Anne Loewen, executor of her husband’s estate, for her consent to use the recordings for their linguistic analysis and use. She granted consent with a letter. Upon her death, their daughters Gladys Loewen and Dorothy Joyce Pauls, contacted Velásquez Runk, notified her of the death, and again conferred consent to analyze the recordings and archive them. Gladys Loewen is executor of her parents’ estate. Recordings were made with a reel-to-reel recorder. Ron Binder stated that “he was pretty sure the recordings were made with an old classic Wollensak 7” reel-to-reel tape recorder.” The Loewen estate has added four photos of Jacob Loewen making recordings, in which his recorder also was pictured. From 2010 – 2014 these recordings were part of the NSF Documenting Endangered Languages Grant Documenting Wounaan meu to the University of Georgia (BCS 0966520) and the University of Arizona (BCS 0966046) together with the approval of the Congreso Nacional del Pueblo Wounaan (CNPW, National Wounaan Congress) and the Fundación para el Desarrollo del Pueblo Wounaan (FUNDEPW, Foundation for the Development of Wounaan People). In this project, known as the Proyecto Tradición Oral Wounaan (Wounaan Oral Traditions Project), a portion of the recordings of Loewen together with those of Elizabeth Lapovsky Kennedy, Ronald Binder, and Julie Velásquez Runk were transcribed and translated by the project’s language experts, Toño Peña Conquista, Chindío Peña Ismare, Doris Cheucarama Membache, Tonny Membora Peña, and Chivio Membora Peña. Wounaan meu (noa); language of the Wounaan people. Wounaan meu is an SOV language that is part of the Chocó language family spoken in Panama and Colombia, differing significantly from the other (Emberá) languages of that language family., [Esta descripción fue proporcionada por Dorothy Joyce Pauls y Gladys Loewen] Esta colección de materiales se basa en las grabaciones captadas por Jacob (Jake) Loewen en Colombia entre 1947 y 1958. En diciembre de 1947 Loewen se mudó a Colombia con su esposa Anne y niña Gladys (nacida en 1947). Vivieron en el pueblo Wounaan de Noanamá en el Río San Juan en el Departamento de Chocó. La tarea de Loewen en Colombia fue reducir el idioma Wounaan a la escritura, y luego estudiar los diez dialectos del idioma Choco en Panamá y Colombia para luego traducir la biblia. Quedaron en Colombia cinco años y luego salieron de permiso en enero de 1953. En aquellos cinco años, nacieron su hija Dorothy Joyce (DJ) en 1950, y su hija Sharon en 1951 en Andagoya, en el hospital para mineros en aquel pueblo que dista unas 4 horas en lancha por el Río San Juan. En el periodo de permiso de dos años, Jacob Loewen terminó su maestría en lingüística en la University of Washington en Seattle. Su tesis magestral de 1954 se titula "Waunana Grammar: A Descriptive Analysis". Nació su hijo William (Bill) en 1954 en Chiliwack, BC, Canadá. El trabajo lingüístico de Jacob Loewen en Colombia siguió después de su permiso de 1955-1957, y en pocos años se extendió a Panamá. En aquellos años los Loewen vivía en Cali en lugar de Noanamá. Como parte de su asignación, Loewen fue a la región Sambú de Panamá para estudiar aquel dialecto del idioma en abril y mayo de 1956. Después de regresar a Colombia en 1957 Loewen se involucró en el programa de la Iglesia Choco en los veranos en Panamá. Éste es un proyecto que duró 25 años de 1959-1984 que pretendió hacer una generación completa de cambio cultural dentro de un marco cristiano. La familia no acompañó a Loewen a Panamá. Falleció Jacob Loewen en 2006. Más información acerca de él y sus obras se puede encontrar junto a sus papeled depositados en Fresno Pacific University, véase http://library.fresno.edu/files/m104.pdf. No está claro cuando Jacob Loewen hizo estas grabaciones durante su residencia en Colombia, aunque sí está claro que radican de este pueblo y no de Panamá. Hace varios años se les dio a Ronald Binder quien las mencionó durante una junta de planificación del Proyecto de Tradición Oral Wounaan en 2008. Investigador principal Julie Velásquez Runk se contactó con Anne Loewen, la ejecutadora del patrimonio de su esposo para su conentimiento para el análisis y uso lingüístico de las grabaciones. Se la dio en una carta. Después de que falleció Anne Loewen, sus hijas Gladys Loewen y Dorothy Joyce Pauls avisaron a Velásquez Runk de su fallecimiento y otorgaron de nuevo su permiso para el análisis y almacenaje de las grabaciones. Gladys Loewen es la ejecutadora del patrimonio de sus padres. Las grabaciones se hicieron con una grabadora de carrete abierta. Ron Binder dijo que "estaba bastante seguro que las grabaciones se realizaton con una vieja grabadora clásica de carrete abierta Wollensak de 7 pulgadas." El patrimonio de Loewen ha proporcionado cuatro fotografías en que aparece Jacob Loewen grabando con dicha grabadora. Desde el 2010 al 2014 las grabaciones formaron parte de la subvención "Documenting Wounaan meu" de la National Science Foundation Documenting Endangered Languages que fue ortogada a la University of Georgia (BCS 0966520) y la University of Arizona (BCS 0966046) junto con la aprobación del Congreso Nacional del Pueblo Wounaan (CNPW) y la Fundación para el Desarrollo del Pueblo Wounaan (FUNDEPW). En este proyecto, conocido como Proyecto Tradición Oral Wounaan, una porción de las grabaciones de Loewen y las de Elizabeth Lapovsky Kennedy, Ronald Binder, y Julie Velásquez Runk fueron transcritas y traducidas por los expertos de idioma del proyecto: Toño Peña Conquista, Chindío Peña Ismare, Doris Cheucarama Membache, Tonny Membora Peña y Chivio Membora Peña. Wounaan meu es una lengua de orden SOV que forma parte de la familia Chocó hablada por Panamá y Colombia. Se distingue significativamente de los demás idiomas de esta familia, los idiomas emberá.
Wounaan Oral Traditions, Velásquez Runk Collection, 2002 – 2004
https://faculty.franklin.uga.edu/runk/content/proyecto-tradición-oral-wounaan, This collection of materials is based on recordings made by Julie/a Velásquez Runk in eastern Panama during 2002 and 2003. Velásquez Runk made these recordings as part of her dissertation research on political and cultural ecology of Wounaan forest use, which was carried out under a research agreement with the Congreso Nacional del Pueblo Wounaan (CNPW, Wounaan National Congress) and the Fundación para el Desarrollo del Pueblo Wounaan (FUNDEPW, Foundation for the Development of Wounaan People). Recordings are from the communities of Majé (frequently known as Majé-Chimán) in eastern Panamá Province, and Puerto (or Boca) Lara, in Darién Province. Velásquez Runk asked villagers to tell traditional stories, which was not frequently being done at the time. Therefore, most recordings are of individuals telling stories into the recorder with Velásquez Runk and Gervacio Ortíz Negría in Majé or Wilio Quintero Quiróz in Puerto Lara. At one point Ortíz Negría made recordings in Majé when Velásquez Runk was absent. On one occasion in Puerto Lara, the community leaders supported a public meeting on story telling, which also became a time for historical remembrances of when the narrator was a child. Because all of the narrators of these recordings are still alive at the time of deposit (2014) Velásquez Runk has signed consent forms from each for their deposit. Additional recordings from 2002 and 2003 may be deposited once Velásquez Runk is able to locate narrators for their consent. Recordings were made with both a cassette and digital recorder. On rare occasions, one of those recorders failed because of spent batteries. Regardless, digital recordings originally were in .MSV format, and those recordings and cassette recordings were transferred into .WAV format at the University of Georgia’s Center for Teaching and Leanring. From 2010 – 2014 these recordings were part of the NSF Documenting Endangered Languages Grant Documenting Wounaan meu to the University of Georgia (BCS 0966520) and the University of Arizona (BCS 0966046) together with the approval of the Congreso Nacional del Pueblo Wounaan (CNPW, National Wounaan Congress) and the Fundación para el Desarrollo del Pueblo Wounaan (FUNDEPW, Foundation for the Development of Wounaan People). In this project, known as the Proyecto Tradición Oral Wounaan (Wounaan Oral Traditions Project), a portion of the recordings of Velásquez Runk together with those of Elizabeth Lapovsky Kennedy, Ronald Binder, and Jacob Loewen were transcribed and translated by the project’s language experts, Toño Peña Conquista, Chindío Peña Ismare, Doris Cheucarama Membache, Tonny Membora Peña, and Chivio Membora Peña., Esta colección de materiales se basa en las grabaciones realizadas por Julie/Julia Velásquez Runk en el oriente de Panamá entre 2002 y 2003. Velásquez Runk hizo las grabaciones como parte de su investigación doctoral acerca de la ecología political y cultural del uso de los bosques por los Wounaan, que se realizó bajo un acuerdo de investigación con el Congreso Nacional del Pueblo Wounaan (CNPW) y la Fundación para el Desarrollo del Pueblo Wounaan (FUNDEPW). Las grabaciones son de las comunidades de Majé (conocido también como Majé-Chimán) en el este de la provincia de Panamá, y en Puerto (o Boca) Lara en la provincia de Darién. Velásquez Runk les pidió a la gente contar cuentos tradicionales, una actividad que se caía en desuso. Por eso, la mayoría de las grabaciones son de individuos contando cuentos en la grabadora con Velásquez Runk y Gervacio Ortiz Negría en Majé o Wilio Quintero Quiroz en Puerto Lara. En una ocasión en Puerto Lara, los jefes de la comunidad apoyaron una asemblea pública acerca de la narración de cuentos, que dio lugar para los recuerdos históricos de la niñez de los hablantes. Ya que todos los hablantes eran vivos cuando se depositaron los archivos (2014), Velásquez Runk tiene consentimientos firmados por sus materiales. Grabaciones adicionales de 2002 y 2003 pueden ser depositados también uan vez que Velásquez Runk pueda localizar los hablantes para sacar las firmas. Las grabaciones se grabaron en casete y en una grabadora digital. En raras ocasiones, se descargaron las pilas de una de las grabadoras. Sin embargo, las grabaciones digitales originales se crearon en format .MSV, y tanto ésas que las grabaciones en casete se convirtieron en formato WAV en el Center for Teaching and Learning de la University of Georgia. De 2010 a 2014 estas grabaciones formaron parte de la subvención Documenting Wounaan meu del programa Documenting Endangered Languages de la National Science Foundation de EEUU ortograda a la University of Georgia (BCS 0966520) y la University of Arizona (BCS 0966046) junto con la aprobación del Congreso Nacional del Pueblo Wounaan (CNPW) y la Fundación para el Desarrollo del Pueblo Wounaan (FUNDEPW). En este proyecto, conocido como el Proyecto Tradición Oral Wounaan (Wounaan Oral Traditions Project), una porción de las grabaciones de Velásquez Runk junto con las de Elizabeth Lapovsky Kennedy, Ronald Binder, y Jacob Loewen se transcribieron y se tradujeron por los peritos de idioma del proyecto, Toño Peña Conquista, Chindío Peña Ismare, Doris Cheucarama Membache, Tonny Membora Peña y Chivio Membora Peña.
Yawarana: documentation project collection
DO NOT CITE THIS COLLECTION. THIS COLLECTION IS UNDER ACTIVE CURATION AND MATERIALS ARE SUBJECT TO DELETION AND REORGANIZATION WITHOUT NOTICE. Materials in and about the Yawarana language of the Parucito river in Venezuela collected since September 2015 on three separate visits to the speakers in the city of Puerto Ayacucho, the town of San Juan de Manapiare and the village of Majagua (additional materials will be collected in 2018). This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number BCS-1500714. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation., NO CITE ESTA COLECCIÓN. LA PRESENTE COLECCIÓN ESTÁ EN CURACIÓN ACTIVA Y LOS MATERIALES SON SUJETOS A ELIMINACIÓN O REORGANIZACIÓN SIN AVISO. Materiales en y acerca del idioma yabarana del río Parucito, Venezuela, recolectados desde septiembre de 2015 en tres visitas distintas a los hablantes en la ciudad de Puerto Ayacucho, el pueblo de San Juan de Manapiare y la comunidad indígena de Majagua (materiales adicionales serán recolectados en 2018). Este material se basa en trabajo apoyado por la National Science Foundation bajo subvención No. BCS-1500714. Cualquier opinión, hallazgo, conclusión o recomendación expresado en este material son del autor/los autores y no necesariamente reflejan aquellos de la National Science Foundation.
Yokot'an (Tabasco Chontal) Dialect Survey
The Yokot'an (Tabasco Chontal) Dialect Survey was planned by Brad Montgomery-Anderson and Terrence Kaufman as part of the Project for the Documentation of the Languages of MesoAmerica in 2010. The questionnaire for this dialect survey was based on the "Linguistic questionnaire for dialect variation research on the languages of Guatemala" (Kaufman 1970-1971), the "Linguistic questionnaire for dialect variation research on the Totonac language" (Kaufman, McKay and Trechsel, 1994), and the "Linguistic questionnaire for dialect variation research on the Zoque language" (Kaufman and Zavala, 2010). Yokot'an is a Mayan language also known as Tabasco Chontal (or simply Chontal), and is not to be confused with the unrelated Chontal languages of Oaxaca. Ethnologue assigns Yokot'an the ISO 639-3 code chf. Surveys were taken in the following communities and municipalities in the Mexican state of Tabasco:
  • Colonia Nueva Esperanza Quintín Arauz, Centla
  • Villa Vicente Guerrero, Centla
  • Isla Guadalupe, Nacajuca
  • Olcuatitán, Nacajuca
  • Tapotzingo, Nacajuca
  • Tecoluta, Nacajuca
  • Tucta, Nacajuca
  • Montegrande, Jonuta
  • Tamulté de las Sabanas, Centro
  • Villa Benito Juárez (previously known as San Carlos), Macuspana
The bulk of the materials were given to AILLA by Terrence Kaufman for digitization and preservation in 2012. Some born-digital materials were given to AILLA after this time. After processing, physical media was returned to Kaufman beginning in May 2018. The collection consists of 14 folders containing 496 audio recordings in WAV or MP3 format, 18 digital document files, and 26 digital images of the towns and people represented in the survey. 10 folders contain all the media (audio, texts, and images) associated with a single set of responses to the dialect survey or biographic interview. One folder contains a blank copy of the questionnaire used for this project, and three folders contain other audio recordings in Yokot'an: a history of one community, a narrative about a married couple, and songs. As of July 2018, there are no transcriptions survey responses in the collection apart from answers to the biographical and sociolinguistic questions of the interview. All items in this collection are restricted at this time. Refer to AILLA's Access Levels and Conditions of Use for more information. Additional materials in Yokot'an (including elicitation recordings, narratives, songs, and more) may be found in the Project for the Documentation of the Languages of MesoAmerica Collection in AILLA. The digitization and preservation of this collection was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. BCS-1157867. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation., La Encuesta Dialectal del Yokot'an (Chontal de Tabasco) fue planteado por Brad Montgomery-Anderson y Terrence Kaufman como parte del Proyecto para la Documentación de las Lenguas de Mesoamérica en 2010. El cuestionario para la encuesta dialectal se basa en “El cuestionario lingüístico para la investigación de las variaciones dialectales en las lenguas de Guatemala” (Kaufman 1970-1971), el “Cuestionario lingüístico para la investigación de las variaciones dialectales de la lengua totonaca” (Kaufman, McKay and Trechsel, 1994) y el "Cuestionario lingüístico para la investigación de las variaciones dialectales de la lengua zoque" (Kaufman y Zavala, 2010). El yokot'an es un idioma mayance conocido también como chontal de Tabasco o simplemente chontal. No se debe confundir con los idiomas chontales no emparentados de Oaxaca. Ethnologue le asigna yokot'an el código ISO 639-3 chf. Se recopilaron datos en las siguientes comunidades y municipios de Tabasco:
  • Colonia Nueva Esperanza Quintín Arauz, Centla
  • Villa Vicente Guerrero, Centla
  • Isla Guadalupe, Nacajuca
  • Olcuatitán, Nacajuca
  • Tapotzingo, Nacajuca
  • Tecoluta, Nacajuca
  • Tucta, Nacajuca
  • Montegrande, Jonuta
  • Tamulté de las Sabanas, Centro
  • Villa Benito Juárez (antigüamente San Carlos), Macuspana
Terrence Kaufman entregó estos materiales a AILLA para su digitalización y preservación en 2012. A partir de entonces se empezó a entregar unos archivos nacidos digitales también. Después del procesamiento, los materiales físicos se devolvieron a Kaufman a partir de mayo del 2018. La colección consta de 14 carpetas que albergan 496 grabaciones de audio en formato WAV o MP3, 18 documentos digitales (2 cuestionarios no rellenados y guías para el intrevisador, 1 documento con apuntes sobre la fonología del nawat de Paso de Cupilco, 2 documentos con fotografías de los pueblos y personas representados en la encuesta, y 7 transcripciones de las respuestas a preguntas biográficas y sociolingüísticas) y 26 imagenes digitales de los pueblos y personas asociados con la encuesta. 10 carpetas contienen todos los materiales (audio, textos, y imágenes) asociados con un conjunto de respuestas a la encuesta dialectal o una entrevista biográfica. Una carpeta incluye una copia del instrumento de la encuesta en blanco y tres carpetas incluyen otras grabaciones en yokot'an: una historia de un pueblo, una narrativa de un matrimonio y canciones. Hasta julio del 2018, no hay transcripciones de las respuestas de las encuestas en la colección, aparte de unos documentos con las respuestas a las preguntas de la porción biográfica de la entrevista. Todos los archivos en esta colección son restringidos para el momento. Refiérese a losNiveles de Acceso y las Condiciones de Uso para más información. Otros materiales en yokot'an (incluyendo grabaciones de elicitaciones gramaticales, narraciones, canciones y más) pueden encontrarse en la Colección del Proyecto para la Documentación de las Lenguas de MesoAmérica en AILLA. La digitalización y preservación de esta colección fue apoyado por la Beca No. BCS-1157867 de la National Science Foundation. Cualquier opinión, hallazgos, conclusión o recomendación expresado en estos materiales son de los autores y no reflejan necesariamente los de la National Science Foundation.

Pages